Meet Aly Grady #contemporary #romance #author #happilyeverafter #books

Please help me welcome a contemporary romance author Aly Grady! Here’s her official bio and then we’ll dive right into finding our more about her books and her writing process.

New England born and Mid-west living with my husband, who puts up with me, and my teenage children, who roll their eyes at me, and our fur kid, Cody, a labradoodle that can’t stand to be separated from me.

I began writing as a challenge. When I surprised myself and wrote the first draft of a complete story I honestly didn’t know what to do with it. It was suggested I seek out a chapter of Romance Writers of America. I did and with the help and guidance of my chapter I’ve written a total of five books.

You can find out more about her at www.alygradybooks.com or follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Aly: I currently have five books published. Four in print and a Christmas novella that is digital only. Written – well, I have two completely done in various stages of editing and three more stories in various stages of the writing process.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Aly: I write Romance. I’m a girly girl at heart and the image of Cinderella dancing off at the end of her story with her Prince Charming is my ultimate fairytale. I want that for everyone. SO, I make the fairytale and happily ever after come true in all my stories.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Aly: My latest release with a relationship of convenience theme. It’s a twist on a marriage of convenience.

Caroline’s flight home for Christmas is cancelled. Frustrated with the weather, a stranger sits next to her in the terminal.

Colin is travelling home for the holiday as well, minus one tiny detail. He told his family he was bringing his girlfriend home. A girlfriend that doesn’t technically exist.

His phone rings. He answers. He begs.

Can Caroline be Colin’s Christmas miracle and pretend to be his girlfriend to his entire family?

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Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Aly: I write in many different places. Most often I’m on my couch. Revising/editing require more concentration for me so I’m usually at my desk.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Aly: I’m most active in the morning or very late at night.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Aly: I read an article in the Wall Street Journal about self-publishing. From there, I contacted a person that was mentioned and that person led me to my first development editor who led me to my cover artist and formatter – so basically it happened by accident.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Aly: My greatest strength… hmm, I’m always doubting myself but I’d say that I can talk to anyone and that conversation skill flows into being able to write dialog.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Aly: Oh, I most certainly come up with situations first.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Aly: My family has always been my number one priority so I write when I can. My husband travels A LOT so I’m a part-time single mom doing double duty with the kids. Both boys are driving now so that is a huge help. As a matter of fact – one drove himself to his summer tennis clinic which allows me time for me!

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Aly: I’m a huge stressball when it comes to my kids. Oldest just graduated from high school and I’ve not been able to concentrate on anything but that. Joy of joy is that my kids are only a year apart in school so I get to do all the worrying all over again.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Aly: I have participated in NaNoWriMo. It was crazy fun and at the end I had my first draft for “A Home For Love”. I sat in the parking lot of a tennis facility with my laptop writing words. It was so intense and I remember in the middle of it thinking it was like a video game tracking the word counter. I had a well thought out story idea which helped me stay the course.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Aly: Right this moment I’m not reading anything. I just finished with graduations and I’m on a deadline to finish editing.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Aly: I gravitate toward Historical Romance. I’d never dare write it, but I love all the detail.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Aly: So, yes, I’m that person. I have all the Harry Potter books that I’ve reread at least three times. I also have the Twilight books that I’ve reread a number of times. Then I have the Chronicles of Narnia series that I’ve read and reread and reread. Yes, children’s books. Why? Probably because they’re easy reading. The worlds that each story is set in is crafted well. It’s an escape to read them. On a more serious note, I’ve reread The Book Thief. When my children had to read it for school I described it as a sad but happy ending. That one is gut wrenching because while the narrator isn’t in the story, the story has been true. It’s probably one of the only real-ish stories that I’ve reread.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Aly: I don’t usually read when I’m mid writing.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Aly: I recently went back to work at a “day job”. My kids are heading off to private universities and me home alone with the dog seemed like an ideal time to seek outside the home interaction.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Aly: Publishing a book is a process with many pieces. Just uploading a book to Amazon isn’t enough. The biggest part of the publishing piece is getting the writer’s name and book title out in front of potential readers. It’s that advertising piece that many writer’s, myself included, fall short on.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Aly: Keep writing. If you have a story to tell, then you should tell it.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Aly: I have a contemporary romance novel I’m editing that revolves around a high school reunion.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Aly: I have a fun story idea that I’ve started for a YA mystery. I love mystery and the who-done-it concept so I’m taking my time because I don’t want to develop it incorrectly (read that as “get it wrong”).

Thanks so much for stopping in to talk about your writing, Aly! It’s interesting how each author has a different process and emphasis. It’s a matter of finding what works by trial and error sometimes.

Happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

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Getting to know Victoria Alexander #historical #romance #author #regency #mustread #fiction #books

I have a real treat for you today! I’m happy to have Victoria Alexander in the interview seat today. She’s an amazing best-selling author of historical romance and if you haven’t read her books, then you should seriously check out her stories. Let’s find out more about her as an author and a writer, starting with her official bio.

Victoria Alexander was an award winning television reporter until she discovered fiction was much more fun than real life. She turned to writing full time and is still shocked it worked out. The #1 New York Times bestselling author has written 37 full length novels, 11 novellas and has been published in more than a dozen different countries.

Victoria grew up traveling the world as an Air Force brat. Today, she lives in Omaha, Nebraska with a long-suffering husband she kills off in every book and two bearded collies in a house under endless renovation and never ending chaos. She laughs a great deal—she has to.

You can find out more about her at www.victoriaalexander.com or follow her on Facebook.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Victoria: 48 published works—37 novels, 11 novellas

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Victoria: I’ve written some paranormals but I mostly write historicals—Regency and Victorian. I love the 19th century! From the beginning years with its rules and traditions to the progress of the last half of the century. We went from horses to trains, candles to gas to electricity. For most of the 19th century progress was in the air. I think it was a really exciting time. And when it comes to fiction—I find it magical.   

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Victoria: My newest release is The Lady Travelers Guide to Happily Ever After (on sale Aug 27th). I never seem to start out with a theme—they tend to evolve. This book is about second chances. It’s the story of two people who had to marry to avert scandal and then go their separate ways. Six years later they’re forced together again.

The story is actually set before the other three books in the Lady Travelers series. The epilogue takes place after the other books so Happily Ever After kind of wraps around the whole series. It is probably the last book in the series. At least for now.

Before there was a Lady Travelers Society there was just one lady traveler

Some marry for love. Some marry for money. But Violet Hagan’s quick marriage to irresponsible James Branham, heir to the Earl of Ellsworth, was to avoid scandal.

Though her heart was broken when she learned James never wanted marriage or her, Violet found consolation in traveling the world —at his expense, finding adventure and enjoying an unconventional, independent life. And strenuously avoiding her husband.

But when James inherits the earldom it comes with a catch—Violet. To receive his legacy he and Violet must live together as husband and wife, convincing society that they are reconciled. It’s a preposterous notion, complicated by the fact that Violet is no longer the quiet, meek woman he married. But then he’s not the same man either. 

Chasing Violet across Europe to earn her trust and prove his worth, James realizes with each passing day that a marriage begun in haste may be enjoyed at leisure. And that nothing may be as scandalous—or as perfect—as falling hopelessly in love. Especially with your wife.

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Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Victoria: I have an office off my living room—about as far away from the rest of the house as I can get—and I do all my work there. My house is just over 100 years old and even though I have high efficiency windows it’s just not enough. So in the summer I have at least one fan going and in the winter I need 2 space heaters just to keep my fingers warm. But wherever there isn’t a window, there are bookshelves so I’m surrounded by research and inspiration. It’s not especially tidy—okay—it’s never tidy but it is cozy and a great place to write and I love it!

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Victoria: I can’t think of any rituals although I do often set a timer and turn off all distractions—tv, internet, email, on-line games etc. until the timer goes off. Then I can take a break. I do always have something to drink—hot tea in the winter (warms me up) and usually ice tea in the summer. I play music sometimes but it’s always instrumental. Songs with words are too distracting and I tend to sing along which is a bit of a problem. As for time of day—it really varies from book to book. With some books my best time to write has been early morning. With others, I haven’t been able to get into writing until late afternoon.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Victoria: Persistence and support from writer friends. I kept sending out my first book to publishers and getting rejections. But while I was trying to sell that one—I started the next. By the time I sold, the second was almost finished.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Victoria: Dialogue and humor. I’m one of those people who talks to herself in the car. That seems to be a big help in writing dialogue. And while I have written some angsty scenes, I much prefer to make people laugh rather than cry. There’s not nearly enough laughter in the world.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Victoria: It really depends. Sometimes it’s situation and the characters develop for that particular story line. Sometimes it’s character. I have a couple of characters from previous books that I’d like to write stories for but coming up with the right story for an already established character isn’t as easy as it sounds.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Victoria: I do try to keep regular hours so I’m usually at my computer Monday-Friday, from about 8:30 to 5:00. And while I try to focus on writing, I am frequently distracted. Sometimes by legitimate things like research and writing blogs. Sometimes—okay more than I want to admit—by fantasy vacations and ebay.   

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Victoria: I’ve been having some repairs done around the house. Really hard to write with people you don’t know running around your house!

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Victoria: Nope. I’ve always wanted to but frankly my life is filled with the pressure of deadlines and commitments. Adding one more thing makes me want to run screaming into the night.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Victoria: The Book Charmer by Karen Hawkins

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Victoria: I don’t have just one favorite. I love contemporaries—preferably funny—as well as women’s fiction, erotica, young adult and paranormal.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Victoria: Honestly, I don’t reread a lot anymore. I have a kindle full of books I haven’t gotten to and a house full of books I still haven’t read. So there’s always something new. But I am planning to reread all of Jodi Taylor’s Chronicles of St. Mary’s books because I’m not sure which ones I haven’t read yet.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Victoria: Actually, I rarely read historicals at all. It’s the world I work in and I’m very critical. Which takes all the fun out of it.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Victoria: I write full time. Well, I try to write full time.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Victoria: Authors don’t have nearly as much control as readers think we do.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Victoria: You have to understand writing is hard and there’s nothing that makes it easier. And every book is harder than the last—as it should be. It means you’re challenging yourself. If writing is what you really want to do—learn everything you can about writing and then do what you want. What you feel is right for the story you want to tell.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Victoria: I’m looking at something different. I’m just not sure what yet.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Victoria: I love writing 1st person. I’d like to do more of that.  Honestly, I have a million ideas so I’m exploring at the moment. It’s kind of an adventure and I’m excited about what comes next.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Victoria! We have a few things in common that I didn’t realize until you so graciously answered my questions. We both write full time, drink iced tea, have a ton of research books, and love historicals, for instance.

I hope everyone is enjoying getting to know my fellow authors, some of whom I’ve met in person, and some, like Victoria, who have helped me in my writing career. Writing, like Victoria said, is not easy. It’s wonderful to have a supportive network of other writers to turn to for answers to questions and for a pep talk when needed.

Now, go find a good book to read. Support your favorite authors! Happy reading, everyone!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Meet Heather Redmond #author of #mystery #cozymystery #mustread #fiction #books

My guest today is none other than Heather Redmond, who also writes romantic suspense under the pen name of Heather Hiestand. But today we’ll focus on what Heather Redmond enjoys writing. What is that, you may ask? Let’s meet her and then dive into the interview to find out!

Longtime Washington State resident Heather Redmond is a committed anglophile, Dickens devotee, and lover of all things nineteenth century. She writes two mystery series, A Dickens of A Crime, featuring young Charles Dickens in the 1830s, and a new cozy mystery series, the Journaling mysteries, set in Seattle which debuts Halloween 2019 in the UK and Feb 1, 2020 in the US. Her latest Dickens title is Grave Expectations, book 2 in the series, and Journaled to Death is book 1 of her cozy series. She also writes as Heather Hiestand.

Find out more about her and her books at www.heatherredmond.com or follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Heather: As Heather Redmond, I have two books published, but five under contract at the moment. Heather Hiestand has been around for fifteen years so the publication list is in the dozens.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Heather: That changes from year to year! Right now, I’m writing two genres of crime fiction as Heather Redmond, historical mystery and cozy mystery. As Heather Hiestand, I’m writing romantic suspense.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Heather: My A Dickens of a Crime series is based on both author Charles Dickens’s life as a young man in London and much more loosely on his novels. My current release, Grave Expectations, is set in the summer of 1835 when he lived in Selwood Terrace and worked at the Morning and Evening Chronicle. I took themes and motifs from his novel Great Expectations. Themes like “the dead don’t stay dead” and “the tug of past life on the present” and motifs like “spiderwebs.” I also wanted to look at the Jewish experience in London because of my own family history so some of my characters are coming from different aspects of Jewish society in London at the time.

In this clever reimagining of Charles Dickens’s life, he and fiancée Kate Hogarth must solve the murder of a spinster wearing a wedding gown . . .
 
London, June 1835: In the interest of being a good neighbor, Charles checks in on Miss Haverstock, the elderly spinster who resides in the flat above his. But as the young journalist and his fiancée Kate ascend the stairs, they are assaulted by the unmistakable smell of death. Upon entering the woman’s quarters, they find her decomposing corpse propped up, adorned in a faded gown that looks like it could have been her wedding dress, had she been married. A murderer has set the stage. But to what purpose?
 
As news of an escaped convict from Coldbath Fields reaches the couple, Charles reasonably expects the prisoner, Ned Blood, may be responsible. But Kate suspects more personal motives, given the time and effort in dressing the victim. When a local blacksmith is found with cut manacles in his shop and arrested, his distraught wife begs Charles and Kate to help. At the inquest, they are surprised to meet Miss Haverstock’s cold and haughty foster daughter, shadowed by her miserably besotted companion. Secrets shrouded by the old woman’s past may hold the answers to this web of mystery. But Charles and Kate will have to risk their lives to unveil the truth . . .

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Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Heather: I have an office in my house and I write there or on a chair in the living room. I mostly write at home.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Heather: I mostly write when my house is empty. School hours or child sleeping hours.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Heather: I sold my first mystery short story to Sisters in Crime for an anthology, Murder Across the Map. That first experience was instrumental in my career as it gave me hope during a long road to publication. I had a couple more years to wait before I sold my first novel.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Heather: I think plotting was always my strength. That lends itself well to the mystery genre where twisty, ever changing paths of investigation is key to reader enjoyment.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Heather: I’m writing series-based mysteries, so I’m always thinking about what the characters that already exist are doing. I have casts of friends and family to keep in touch with. For the A Dickens of a Crime series, I also pick one of Dickens’s novels to concentrate on. I reread it and take a look at the themes and motifs and use them to lead me into a plot. For my new cozy series, the heroine owns her own journaling business and is also a hospital barista, so my plots are grounded in those experiences.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Heather: During school days, my focus is on the writing. During the summer, it’s stolen moments.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Heather: I always struggle in the summer because of having a child underfoot all day. I war between keeping up the obligations of a job and mom time.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Heather: I have participated and even “won.” However, I’m not always in a drafting phase exactly on November first and if I have to tend to other obligations, I don’t have enough time to write 50K and do other things like edits, plotting and so forth.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Heather: I am giving a library presentation on “Writing Exciting Mysteries” on August 3rd, so I’m prepping for it by rereading the fantastic novels I preselected for the presentation, so the library could have them on hand. I’m also listening to A Great Deliverance by Elizabeth George on audio.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Heather: My guilty pleasure long before I wrote it was cozy mystery. Current favorites are authors like Marty Wingate, Kellye Garret, Vivien Chien, Krista Davis, and Ellie Alexander.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Heather: Because of this presentation, I’m delighting in my keeper shelf right now. Authors on it include Agatha Christie, Lindsey Davis, Rhys Bowen, Elizabeth Peters, and Margaret Maron. But I rarely read a book more than once. I can go twenty-five years between rereads.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Heather: I’m actually a very eclectic reader, so I doubt too much sticks from my reading, even if I’m writing in the same genre. I always have multiple books going at once, including tons of middle grade fiction that I’m reading with my child.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Heather: Writing is my day job.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Heather: I wish they knew that very few of us are even making minimum wage. We can’t afford to hand out a lot of free books and tchotchkes that are far from free to us.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Heather: The first thing is to finish your first book before you worry about anything in the industry. The second is to make sure you’re getting some kind of professional feedback before you publish it, whatever your path might be.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Heather: I am pitching the next Dickens book, drafting the third book in my Kent Confidential romantic suspense series (as Heather Hiestand), and drafting my second cozy mystery.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Heather: Cozy is my newest endeavor, and was actually started one hundred percent just for fun during some down time in the spring of 2018. So that’s my latest experiment. My agent didn’t expect it to sell so easily, so experiment became a new career path for me very recently! It’s great to try new things.

Thanks, Heather, for sharing about your stories in all your genres and pen names!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Claudia Shelton #author of #romance #suspense #thriller #fiction #books

Today I’d like to introduce you to a plunge-write-in (get it?) type of author. Claudia Shelton writes romantic suspense among other genres for a very specific reason she’ll tell you shortly. First, her official bio and then we’ll get to the interview itself.

Award-winning author Claudia Shelton could write her name before the first day of school, but now she writes romantic suspense, thrillers and contemporary romance. In addition, she presents workshops for readers and authors. Her debut novel, Risk of a Lifetime, released to 5-star reviews, reached Amazon’s Best Sellers Romance Series Top 100 and was named one of eBooks Galore top reads for 2014. She is also a two-time nominated Daphne Du Maurier (Unpublished) finalist for excellence in mystery. Claudia is the author of the Shades of Leverage action-adventure romantic suspense series.

On a personal note, Claudia considers herself a traveler, music lover and water person. A cool drink while listening to the splash of waves is always nice—so is a mug of hot chocolate in the falling snow. Her main priority is spending time with family, friends and her two sweet, conniving rescue dogs.

You can find out more about her and her books at her website http://claudiasheltonauthor.com/ or by following her on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

I have completed six manuscripts and have published three of them with Entangled Publishing.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Claudia: I write romantic suspense because I love a fast-paced action adventure with lots of plot twists, yet also want the happily ever after of a romance. Gradually, I’ve learned there can be a happily ever after, or happy for now, within a suspense or thriller; so with that in mind, I’m planning a series that is even more suspense/thriller based. But, don’t worry I’ll always have a romantic suspense work in progress or ready for release.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Claudia: I’ve always thought of myself as a water person, and Dangerous Lies is definitely set around water.

To ex-Navy SEAL Mitch Granger, responsibility isn’t just a word. It’s his Code of Honor. But when assigned to protect Coercion Ten’s latest target, she challenges his authority, defies his rules, and wreaks havoc on his personal willpower. Fighting for her isn’t a problem. Giving his life for her isn’t a problem. Forgetting their world-stopping kiss? Definite problem. And if he can’t concentrate solely on keeping her safe, it may cost them both their lives.

Journalist Liz Walkert’s missing father sent her a cryptic message that she was in danger. What he didn’t tell her was why. Unbeknownst to Liz, her family has been in Witness Protection all her life. Mitch may be her bodyguard, but his protection comes close to being control, the one thing she has none of in his presence. After a kidnap attempt and a narrow escape from attacking CT forces, they both realize they’re going to need to focus on the mission and fight their attraction if they have any hope of surviving.

Each book in the Shades of Leverage series is STANDALONE:
* Slater’s Revenge
* Dangerous Lies

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Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Claudia: I’m lucky enough to have an office which I’ve decorated in a beach theme.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Claudia: No rituals, however music sometimes helps me in planning out my book. I’m not a plotter till half way through the manuscript, but I do write scenes in my head and certain songs can help that process. But every manuscript has a different song that helps (sometimes two).

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Claudia: Never give up!

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Claudia: My alpha heroes, plot twists, and exciting action-packed endings.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Claudia: At least one character! Sometimes the other character arrives close behind, but occasionally I have to search for the other one. After the first character, there’s usually the location, then the premise of the story—no plotting, just the premise.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Claudia: I’m involved in my writing daily, with a few days off here and there. But when I’m on deadline I calculate the amount of words left in the story, divide by days left before deadline and make sure I get the allotted amount of words in weekly.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Claudia: Time crunch. Writing, marketing, social media and everything else that publishing entails, doesn’t just happen in one neat ten-minute slot.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Claudia: No…that’s not how I write.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Claudia: Depends on my mood. I usually have more than one book being read at a time.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Claudia: I have certain books I keep, but I seldom go back and reread them.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Claudia: Most times not the same genre. However, if it is the same genre, I make sure it is in no way close to the story I’m writing.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Claudia: Full-time writer.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Claudia: I write my stories because the characters speak to me. I write my stories because they need to be told. And, I write my stories for you—the reader. In turn, I need you to leave a review or tell the world how much you enjoyed the book, the characters, the setting, my writing. Otherwise, the publishers can’t know how the readers feel about my book and my stories may never see the light of day.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Claudia: Write! Attend workshops and conferences. Write! Find yourself a critique group or start one yourself. Write! Read books on writing a book, and also ones on writing your specific genre. Write, write, write— And never give up!

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Claudia: My publisher has me writing the third book in the Shades of Leverage series, which will be set in the northwest. Think mountains and river rapids, horses and a secluded cabin, and lots of action-packed romantic suspense!

And later this year, I will self-pub a couple of books—one of which will be a Christmas book.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Claudia: Instead of Romantic Suspense, I’m planning a future series that centers on the Suspense/Thriller genre. And I’m always playing with the idea of a cozy mystery.

Thanks so much for stopping by, Claudia!

I think her stories and her writing process are both equally fascinating. If you enjoy romantic suspense, I hope you’ll give Claudia’s books a try.

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Meet Kathleen Buckley #historical #romance #author #Georgian #histfic #mustread #fiction

Today I’m happy to welcome a fellow historical author, Kathleen Buckley. I think you might find something of interest in her books, but I’ll let her tell you all about what she writes, her process for doing so, and maybe a hint at her next book. First, here is her official bio.

After a varied career which included being a paralegal and a security officer, Kathleen Buckley began to write historical romances. She is now the author of three Georgian romances: An Unsuitable Duchess, Most Secret, and Captain Easterday’s Bargain, with a fourth, A Masked Earl, currently in the editing process. They are perhaps best described as “powder & patch & peril”: romance with adventure (and occasional humor) rather than drawing room romance. Among her hobbies is the recreation of 18th-century baked goods because they are reliably good, whereas boiled tongue and udder with root vegetables fails to appeal. She sometimes finds it odd that she writes novels set in 1740s England although she lives in 21st-century New Mexico. Connect with her on her blog at https://writing-on-el-camino-real.blogspot.com/ or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/anunsuitableduchess/.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Kathleen: I’ve written three which have been published in the last two years, and a fourth which is currently in production. I self-published another.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Kathleen: My three recent novels are Georgian period historical romances set in the 1740s. I love Georgette Heyer’s novels, and wanted to see if I could write one similar. I set them in the 1740s because I became fascinated with that decade as a result of a paper I wrote in college about the publication of Samuel Richardson’s novel, Pamela

I’ve also written three crime fiction short stories, two of them published in anthologies edited by the late Robert Bloch (before he was “…the late…”), one in an online magazine. Why crime fiction? I’ve always enjoyed mysteries, and I took a couple of classes in murder/criminal investigation.

A few years I self-published a coming of age novel about a dumpster-diving adolescent loner. The story just came to me and I wasn’t writing anything else, so…

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Kathleen: Captain Easterday’s Bargain is the story of a woman’s struggle to succeed in a male-dominated business (the shipping trade in the 18th century Pool of London). More than two centuries later, women still face challenges in their work. The “bad boy” is a minor motif.  It’s a common theme in romantic fiction, and I thought it was time to re-evaluate it.

London’s cutthroat shipping trade is no place for a lady, although Olivia Cantarell has secretly acted as her father’s assistant for years. Now she has inherited his company, she has no mind to give up control over it—and herself—by marrying, however flattering it is to be sought after for the first time in her life. In spite of threats and intimidation, she will fight to keep her business. 

Careful, responsible, and twice jilted, Captain Marcus Easterday has no heart to attempt marriage a third time. But he cannot stand by and see a woman cheated of her livelihood by Ambrose Hawkins, rumored to be a former pirate, a man whose name is known and feared in ports from the West Indies to China. 

Courted by the ruthless Hawkins while relying on the scrupulous Easterday’s help, Olivia must conceal the identity of one of her clerks and protect her company and employees. Who can she trust?

Amazon      Apple      Barnes & Noble     Kobo

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Kathleen: I have a home office/sewing/hobby room—where else to stash the computer, printer, sewing machines, reference books, all their related bits, and the shelves and multiple file cabinets to store them? I’m a desktop writer, not a laptop writer, and can’t imagine being able to concentrate on writing if I were sitting in a coffee house or under a tree. 

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Kathleen: For my invariable early morning writing session, I drink coffee. Nothing fancy: the inexpensive kind from Costco or the supermarket, made in a Mr. Coffee. Half-and-half, no sugar—though I do like a strong coffee, not “light” or “medium”.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Kathleen: My dumpster-diving adolescent loner non-romance for which I had high hopes was either rejected or ignored by about thirty agents, and I’d given up on it. Because I can’t not write, I wrote a historical romance for my own amusement, attempting to mimic Georgette Heyer’s style. When I finished, I thought I’d see what publishers were accepting historical romance novels.  A Google search revealed there were romance publishers who didn’t require submission through an agent. I narrowed the list to two, and queried one based on Internet research about them. The Wild Rose Press has been a great choice. It took only 43 days from initial query to contract, and they’ve now published three of my romances, with a fourth currently in production.  

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Kathleen: I sit at my computer and do it. A bumper sticker I once saw says it all: “80% of success is showing up”.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Kathleen: Oh, the germ of the situation, definitely. My second book, Most Secret, started with the thought, “What if someone imported French army surplus muskets for the Jacobite rebels in 1745?” That took care of both the situation and the setting, and the characters I needed fell into place.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Kathleen: I get up early, sometimes as early as four a.m., and start by making a pot of coffee and feeding the cats. Then I write while drinking the coffee, for anything between an hour and a half and four hours. I rarely deviate from this, although once in a while I put in some additional time later in the day if I’m really percolating with ideas.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Kathleen: My current project bubbled along nicely until about the 63,000 word mark. Then, as almost always happens, I wondered where the last 25,000 to 30,000 words were going to come from. And as always happens, after re-reading some parts and thinking for a while, I have a good idea where I need to go and what I need to deal with.    

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Kathleen: I don’t, and for exactly the same reason I don’t “make a quilt in a weekend!” as quilting magazines are always encouraging one to do. It doesn’t sound like fun. With both novels and patchwork quilts, I enjoy the process as much as the end result. I make quilts from scraps, putting the different colors and prints together in a way I think is pleasing, and stitch by hand.  This technique does not work well with the two or three color, rotary-cut method of speedy quilt construction. And I write the same way, letting the characters and story grow organically from the situation. 

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Kathleen: As I write this, I’m re-reading Mary Jo Putney’s Lost Lords series. Next in line is Donna Andrews’s cyber-sleuth mystery, You’ve Got Murder, followed by the third and fourth books in the series, Access Denied and Delete All Suspects. I came upon the second book, Click Here for Murder, and immediately went looking for the others.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Kathleen: I can’t decide between historical romance and historical mysteries.   

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Kathleen: Oh, dear. The mysteries of Louise Penny, Charles Todd, Anne Perry, Thomas Perry, Dick Francis/Felix Francis, Tony Hillerman, and Dorothy Sayers. The historical novels of Diana Norman/Ariana Franklin. The late Sarah Caudwell’s funny English legal novels. Science fiction/fantasy: the Harry Potter books, Lois McMaster Bujold, Mercedes Lackey, and Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series. Georgian and Regency novels: Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer, Eileen Dreyer, Lucinda Brant, Mary Balogh, Jo Beverley, Mary Jo Putney, Grace Burrowes, Jane Aiken Hodge, and Sheri Cobb South. And those are just the major ones.

How often I reread them depends on whether I need something soothing, want polished prose and keen wit, an intricate plot, or a fun read. I might read the same book or series twice in a year, or once in five years. Over time, my list has changed, with some books dropped and others added. Good thing I have a lot of bookshelves.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Kathleen: I read historical romance pretty steadily, whether I’m writing or not, but I also read mysteries, historical fiction, fantasy/science fiction, and occasionally mainstream novels.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Kathleen: I’m retired, with a little flexible part-time job doing legal billing and Quickbooks for a former employer/friend, and write up to several hours per day.  

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Kathleen: People, whether readers or aspiring writers, often think writing a book is an easy way to make money and earn fame. I don’t think they ever think about the publishing industry as separate from the business (or hobby) of writing. Shoot, I don’t know what I think about the publishing industry, beyond the fact that the big brick-and-mortar publishers only accept submissions through agents. And with self-publishing and e-books, it’s a totally different game than it was twenty years ago.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Kathleen: The first thing is, sit down and write. No class or book will really teach you to write. In fact, I don’t believe they’ll do you any good until you’ve spent some time writing on your own. Then what they teach will start to make sense. Keep writing. Realize that a justified criticism of your story is not a personal attack on you, and that as an aspiring writer, many criticisms will be justified. You can’t improve unless someone points out the problems. And grammar and spelling count, as do errors of fact.

Please, if you self-publish, proofread at least twice, separated by at least a couple of weeks, and then have someone else whose spelling and grammar are above average proofread it as well.

Betty: Any hints of what your next writing project might be?

Kathleen: The one I’m currently writing includes an arranged marriage and Ambrose Hawkins, a secondary character in Captain Easterday’s Bargain, being charged with murder.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Kathleen: I’d like to try writing a non-romance historical mystery. But I’ll have to wait for the right idea to come along. 

Thanks for swinging by, Kathleen, and sharing your advice and insights! Best of luck with your next release, too.

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Meet Ramcy Diek #debut #fiction #author #contemporary #romance #amreading #amwriting

My guest today is a debut author with quite an interesting story to tell! Please help me welcome Ramcy Diek, author of romantic novels with an eye to branching out to young adult and memoir. Here’s her official bio and then we’ll begin the interview…

Thirty years ago, Ramcy Diek fell in love with the United States while traveling around in an Oldsmobile station-wagon with her husband. They are both born and raised in the Netherlands. Together, they visited all the amazing northern states and landed in California.

Eventually, they found their way to the Pacific Northwest, built up a business, and raised their two boys into amazing young adults with their own careers. During this time, she also made a slow transition from reader to writer of contemporary, enjoyable, laid back, and romantic stories.

You can find out more about her at www.ramcydiek.com or by following her on Facebook, Twitter, or Goodreads.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Ramcy: I wrote seven manuscripts so far, but only published one.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Ramcy: I enjoy reading stories that grip me, and are different; therefore I want to write stories like that too. Although so far, I mainly wrote romantic novels, I’m starting to lean to Young Adult stories and writing my memoir. At 57, I’m still trying to find my voice.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Ramcy: My debut novel, Storm at Keizer Manor, is a time travel romance. It is very well received and readers ask for more. Of all the books I wrote (unpublished) this is the only one about time travel. I hope I won’t disappoint with my second book.

Storm at Keizer Manor received awards in three national book contests and it will be translated in Italian this coming summer. I’m so excited. If anything, this is the encouragement that will keep me writing.

While college graduate Forrest tries to find a job, quick witted Annet works at the Keizer Manor, the museum where the oils from 19th-century master painter Alexander Keizer are exhibited.

After a fight, the couple strolls through the dunes to talk. When dark clouds roll in, the beautiful sunny weather turns into a thunderstorm so violent that they get separated.

The next morning, Forrest finds himself alone. So does Annet.

Regaining consciousness in a monastery, Annet is convinced the nuns are playing a prank on her. It can’t be the 1800s! She’s a pregnant Twenty-first Century woman and doesn’t belong there. But how will she get back to her own time?

Amazon

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Ramcy: I only write at home, behind my desktop. It’s the only place that works for me.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Ramcy: I poured so much love in Storm at Keizer Manor that I decided to hire a professional editor. While editing, my editor Shelly fell in love with it and encouraged me to publish it through Acorn Publishing LLC. Without Shelly, Storm at Keizer Manor would probably still just be a manuscript on my computer.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Ramcy: I wish I could answer this. J As many other authors, I’m very insecure about my writing.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Ramcy: The situation, for sure.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is it more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Ramcy: I can write days on end, and then don’t write at all for weeks. My life is not very structured.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Ramcy: Time. It goes too fast.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Ramcy: No, I didn’t. I don’t like the pressure.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Ramcy: I’m reading a Path of Progress: One Man’s Fight for Women’s Rights by Flora Beach Burlingame. Flora is in her eighties.  

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Ramcy: Suspense and crime novels.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Ramcy: I don’t like to keep books, but of course there are some that I loved so much, that I will always carry them with me. Sidney Sheldon was the first author I really enjoyed, and I have a box full of his books.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Ramcy: There are some genres I just won’t read, but other than that, I pick up anything.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Ramcy: For me, writing is a hobby, and it always will be. I write when I feel like it.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Ramcy: It’s very easy to self-publish, and although this brings forth amazing works from authors who would never be published otherwise, it also means there are a lot of self-published books out there not worth your time.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Ramcy: Making it big is only for very few of us. Just write for yourself, because you love it. And then, who knows…..

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Ramcy: I’m working on my second novel, Eagle in Flight, that I hope to publish next year, and on the translation of Storm at Keizer Manor in Dutch, my native language.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Ramcy: Thirty years ago, my husband and I experienced five disastrous years. I just found all the letters I mailed to my parents during that time and would love to use them to write a memoir. I can’t wait to start.

It sounds like you’re off to a great start, Ramcy! Not everyone completes a book or then follows through to publish it. Wishing you all the best as you move forward!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Meet #author Katherine Evans #contemporary #romance #mustread #fiction #NOLA #amwriting #amreading

The number of different paths to success are amazing! Here’s one writing path that led contemporary romance author Katherine L. Evans from Wattpad to bestselling status with works that are “superbly captivating.” But let her tell you all about her books and her writing process. Here’s her official bio and then we’ll dive into the actual interview.

Katherine L. Evans is a bestselling author of emotionally-driven love stories that stay in your heart long after you reach The End. With a background in 19th-Century English Literature and Journalism, she has been honored with several writing awards, and her work has been featured in academic literary journals and anthologies. As the author of more than thirteen contemporary romance novels, Katherine’s work has been described by readers and book bloggers as “heartfelt, entrancing, and superbly captivating.” She is a native of Austin, Texas, where she lives with her three best guys, her husband, son, and yellow lab named Dave.

You can get to know her better at www.katherinelevans.com, and follow her on Twitter, Facebook, and Goodreads.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Katherine: I just celebrated the publication of my thirteenth novel earlier this month. Outside of novels, I’ve contributed to three anthologies, with two more slated for the forthcoming year.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Katherine: The vast majority of my novels (eleven out of thirteen) are contemporary romance. I’ve always been drawn to stories about relationships. As a child, I read books that focused on friendships, and now it’s exclusively romantic relationships. People can be fascinating and the dynamics within which we relate and interact with each other is not only entertaining, but is an endless source of complexities that can teach us more about ourselves.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Katherine: Breaking the Rules is all about off-limits affection and embracing the unexpected. We can’t always get the exact happy ending we have in mind, but if we have an open heart, we can often find something even better. The story follows a woman who starts out head-over-heels in love with someone who has some very problematic shortcomings and doesn’t have her best interests at heart, but she soon realizes there’s something else out there that ultimately gives her what her heart always truly desired.

Carson McDermott does what he damn well pleases. As the eldest son of one of the wealthiest families in New Orleans, he did his time in college and law school, and now he placates his family by keeping a day job as a contract attorney. By night, however, he’s gunning for the title of the city’s most eligible bachelor and samples the finest women the Big Easy has to offer—including the beautiful blonde at the bar next to him one particular evening, who seems to be in a really foul mood. And Carson knows just the way to cheer her up.

Sabrina Deneau is unlucky in love and back in her hometown of New Orleans after ten long years away. When the man she’s been pining after for two years gives her the ultimate brush-off, Sabrina slinks off to a bar to drown her sorrows—and the sexy stranger attempting to coax her out of her bad mood at a bar one evening is the perfect place to start.

After a mind-blowing one-night-stand, Sabrina is in much better spirits and opts to join her older brother and his friends for dinner the following evening—only to find herself seated right next to Carson.

Sabrina and Carson agree there can’t be a repeat of the one night they had together, but she’s still got his phone number… and he’s still got hers.

She’s still stuck on using him to heal her broken heart.

And Carson can’t seem to tell his best friend’s hot-as-hell baby sister no—even though he knows it might literally get him killed if anyone finds out.

Amazon

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Katherine: I am a couch writer! We have the softest, squishiest couch in the world, and honestly, writing at a desk feels too much like being back in school.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Katherine: I always have a coffee and a water, and for every book I’m working on, I create a new playlist to fit the tone of the story. Headphones are also a must, given that I live with three very loud boys.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Katherine: I started out writing fiction on Wattpad back in 2014, and the story I posted got so much traffic and enthusiasm that it became one of the most popular ones in the romance category, so I thought I’d query a couple of publishers. I got three contracts within a week and picked the one with the best reputation. After being with them for three years and five novels, I decided to go the indie author route and now publish exclusively through Amazon.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Katherine: Tapping into the depth of emotions. All of my books consistently receive reviews that state the reader ran the gamut of emotions. So when you read any of my books, prepare to laugh, cry, swoon, and pretty much everything in between.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Katherine: Generally, I take something I see or hear in real life that involves some kind of complicated relationship dynamics and let my imagination run wild from there. So it’s typically a situation, and from there I figure out what the characters’ histories are that would land them in that situation, and eventually choose a setting that compliments the story.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Katherine: I adopted Chris Fox’s concept of the “tortoise enclosure” and starting my day with writing. To avoid being interrupted, I start writing at 5 a.m. every morning, which gives me two hours of uninterrupted writing time before everyone wakes up.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Katherine: The quantity of books I’ve written over the past twelve months has caused me to recently develop serious emotional exhaustion. My Romance in New Orleans series is a true saga in that it’s long and emotionally complex, with many characters that share multiple complex connections to each other, and also has a great deal of tragedy in varying degrees. It’s been a marathon, and as I approach the end, I’ve noticed my stamina is waning a little.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Katherine: I participated in Camp NaNo earlier this year to help my friend get enthusiasm for her cabin, however I never saw the need for NaNoWriMo given that I typically write a 90-100k word novel every month anyway.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Katherine: As a huge supporter of my fellow indie authors, I’m currently reading Holding Out for Paris, by Gabrielle Ashton, which is her debut novel. It’s wonderful, and I can tell this young lady is going to go far.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Katherine: Romance, of course! But I also love Nineteenth Century British Classics

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Katherine: Wasted by Marya Hornbacher and Jane Austen’s Persuasion. At least once every couple of years.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Katherine: I do! If I’m ever struggling to get words out, I know it’s that my creative tank is low and I need to refill it with inspiration from my peers in the romance genre.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Katherine: I am very fortunate to be a full-time writer! Prior to writing books, I was a freelance writer in the marketing industry, so writing has always paid the bills for me.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Katherine: That it’s nowhere near as glamorous as it seems and it is a LOT of work. It also stops feeling super exciting after releasing your second or third book. You arrive at a point where it’s just part of the job. You still love it, but it is WORK.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Katherine: You can’t avoid marketing, even if you are traditionally published, so get started on learning the ropes as soon as you can.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Katherine: I have a wildly dramatic and emotional series finale in the works for my Romance in New Orleans Saga, one that is going to break a lot of hearts of the readers of this series, but that will also mend those broken hearts in beautiful fashion. My next series will be a spin off set in a fictional mountain town just outside of Portland that follows one of the relatives of a major character from the RNO saga. Tentatively titled Eastwood Valley, this new series will debut in 2020.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Katherine: I’m secretly dabbling under a pseudonym in Gaslamp Fantasy, which is similar to Steampunk except that the focus is on the magic rather than the machinery.

What an interesting path to publication and finding your readers, Katherine! Thanks so much for stopping in and sharing your background and writing process.

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.