Getting to know Leslie Scott #author #contemporary #cowboys #dragracing #dragracinglife #racing #romance #fiction

I’m thrilled to introduce you all to my friend and chapter mate, Leslie Scott! Leslie writes fast-paced and entertaining romances. But I’ll let her tell you more about herself and her stories. Let’s peek at her bio and then get to the good stuff!

Leslie Scott is a self-proclaimed word wizard who hails from the Rocket City (Huntsville, AL). She lives and writes at home with her four dogs, four cats, Prince Charming, and #bestkid. Her fast-paced, energetic romance style is award nominated—a fact she can’t quite comprehend.

You can learn more about Leslie at www.lesliescottromance.com, or follow her on Facebook or Twitter.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Leslie: Written? I’m sitting around a dozen right now. Though, only three are currently released (with three more contracted and in the pipeline for release soon).

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Leslie: They tell you to pick a sub-genre of romance and stick with it. I find that impossible. I can’t stop the ideas and if they don’t fit into one slated genre I’m not going to just NOT write it. So, I have Contemporary Westerns, New Adult Romance, Urban Fantasy, Suspense, are all in my wheelhouse and you’ll be seeing some of them all by next year.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Leslie: Family. My Arkadia Fast series gets called “a racing series” a lot, but it’s really not. At the core of Hot Lap is the heroine’s desperate desire for the family that has been denied to her and the hero’s love and acceptance—because she IS his family.

Starting a new life isn’t easy when the skeletons locked in her closet are the notorious town drunk for a father and a haunted past. But, Hadley Morgan isn’t one to shy away from second chances or giving them either.

When a young, single father wrapped up in an octane fueled package takes particular interest in her, she begins to dream. But well-known drag racer Aiden Casey is also her boss, making her hesitate to grab at her chance at happiness.

Will her secrets shatter their chance at love or will his past come back to destroy both of them?

Amazon      Google Play      Kobo      Barnes & Noble

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Leslie: I do not. I homeschool my son, so often I’m working as he is. That could be the kitchen table, around the large computer desk in the living room, on the couch, on my bed, in my office. Wherever I happen to be, I write.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Leslie: No special rituals here, unless you count writing all the time. To be honest, most of the time I’d rather be at home writing than anywhere else in the world.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Leslie: The lovely Ms. Vonnie Davis (Contemporary and Paranormal Romance Author). I went in search of a critique partner and found her. I would never have received my publishing contract without her. She took a chance on a novice writer and taught me so very much. I could never repay her for what she’s taught me, what she’s given me.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Leslie: Time and again readers praise me for writing characters that feel like family to them.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Leslie: I love this question. Usually it’s a situation or the characters, or perhaps a combination of both.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Leslie: Most of my writing happens late at night. I can edit/revise anywhere, anytime. But writing, drafting out an idea is easiest when I don’t have any interruptions.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Leslie: I don’t write fast enough. I have so many ideas, and not enough hours in the day to get them all out on paper.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Leslie: I do, indeed. I love Nano, it’s a great reminder for me to let the rest of the business go and just lose myself in the crafting of a new story.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Leslie: Alyssa Cole’s A Duke by Default. It’s refreshing and so much fun.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Leslie: Urban Fantasy is high on my list, for sure.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Leslie: Would you believe I’ve never reread a book? It’s just not my thing. There are just so many new stories being written, that I’d rather enjoy something fresh. I’m the same way with movies, which drives Mr. Scott insane. He’ll watch his favorites over and over and I’m a one and done kinda girl.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Leslie: Never really thought about that. I just read whatever tickles my fancy at the time.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Leslie: My day job is that I homeschool my twelve-year-old son, otherwise I write full time.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Leslie: That it is a painstakingly slow business. In the few hours/days it takes you to read a book it took that author months or years to create it.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Leslie: In the words of Queen Nora (Roberts)… ASFK … ass to seat, fingers to keys, it’s the only way you’ll ever get it done.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Leslie: Yee-haw? Kidding, but I love me some cowboys.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Leslie: I’d maybe like to try an epic fantasy sort of adventure, something my son would enjoy reading and could read with his children someday.

Thanks, Leslie, for joining me today!

If you haven’t sampled Leslie’s writing, I encourage you to do so. Her zest for life and love of family shines through her stories!

Happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Tabetha Waite #author #historical #Regency #Victorian #Gothic #romance #CommonElementsRomanceProject

I have a bonus interview to share with you! It’s Release Day for Tabetha Waite’s  Common Elements Romance Project historical romance, Behind A Moonlit Veil. Congratulations, Tabetha! She’ll be posting about her new release during the Wednesday, 9/25 historical romance genre day of the Facebook launch party, so please hop over and introduce yourself and find out more about her and her book! Now, let’s start off the author interview like we normally do, seeing her bio and then getting into the meat of the interview.

Tabetha Waite is the multi-award winning author of the historical romance Ways of Love Series. She is a certified PAN member of the RWA and currently holds a milestone pin for 5 published romances. She began her writing journey in 2016 and was traditionally published by a small press, before bridging over to indie in 2019.

She is a small town, Missouri girl who continues to make her home in the Midwest with her husband and two wonderful daughters. You can find her on most any social media site, and she encourages fans of her work to join her mailing list for updates.

Learn more about her at https://www.authortabethawaite.wix.com/romance, or follow her on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Tabetha: To date, I have five novels and four novellas.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Tabetha: I normally write Regency romance, but I don’t like to box myself into one genre. In such, I decided to try something new with this story.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Tabetha: I decided that the Common Elements would fit perfect for a Victorian Gothic story centered around Jack the Ripper.

An evil lurks in the darkest corners of Victorian London…

Amaris Maxwell has lived her entire life with ill health. As the daughter of a prominent doctor, it never occurred to her to question his abilities, nor his associate’s rather unorthodox treatments. But the life of a sheltered woman has its disadvantages. She yearns to be free, to live an existence outside the same four walls. It isn’t until fate thrusts her into the path of Mr. Jackson Moreland that she begins to question everything she’s ever known. As a mysterious killer begins to terrorize the streets of London, Amaris realizes that things are not always how they may appear…

But how close is the true villain?

Jackson Moreland has lived the last two years of his life in a personal hell after the brutal murder of his wife. Released from an asylum, he struggles to come to terms with his reality. When he is engaged by Scotland Yard to assist in learning the identity of the murderer of Whitechapel, everything changes the moment he meets Amaris. He knows something isn’t right and he’s determined to find out what it is.

As things progress between them and secrets are revealed amid their growing attraction, they begin to fear that the true threat may not be the Ripper after all.

Amazon US      Amazon UK      Barnes & Noble      Kobo      Apple

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Tabetha: Usually my couch in the living room! But I do have a desk that I use as well.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Tabetha: I prefer to write in the mornings after I get up, when my brain is fresh! And I ALWAYS write to music. Not any certain kind, it just depends on what fits the scene.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Tabetha: I wanted to write since I was nine years old. But it wasn’t until three manuscripts and 63 rejections that I finally got a contract offer. I suppose the first push I gave myself was when I was writing my second book. I joined a critique site called www.bookcountry.com. It was a great tool when it came to getting feedback.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Tabetha: I’d like to think that I have the ability to paint a picture for the reader, to keep them turning the pages to find out what happens to the characters.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Tabetha: It’s usually the characters. I have to find out who I’m dealing with before I can build a world around them.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is it more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Tabetha: I usually just write when I can find the time. During the summer it’s easier, as I work part time during the school year, but once school starts, it cuts that time down a lot. I couldn’t even imagine working full time. My hat truly goes off to those that juggle it all.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Tabetha: Writer’s block can be a true hurdle for me. I usually know how the beginning and the ending of a story will go, but sometimes the journey can be a bit challenging. Usually I just take a step back and read or watch a movie until inspiration strikes again.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Tabetha: I have in the past, but not always. Writing sprints do help, but I’ve found I do better if I go at my own pace.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Tabetha: I just finished The Savior by JR Ward. I love the BDB Series!

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Tabetha: Historical romance. It will always be my first love!

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Tabetha: I have several authors that have a permanent place on my shelf, including Sabrina Jeffries, Lisa Kleypas, Sophie Jordan, Sarah MacLean, Julianne MacLean, Anne Mallory and many more! One of my favorite books to reread is A Rose in Winter by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Tabetha: I do like to read in the same genre, just to immerse myself in that specific time period.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Tabetha: There’s no easy answer. A lot of people ask me for advice and all I can really say is do your research. Find out who represents your genre. Make sure you have an editor. There’s a lot of competition, so grow your social media, your network and your brand.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Tabetha: Don’t give up! If this is a dream you have, don’t take no for an answer.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Tabetha: While I have a few more things releasing this year, I’m planning a new fantasy novel to release next year! It’s something a bit different for me, but I’m excited to share the world that’s been brewing!

Thanks for stopping in on your busy release day, Tabetha! Congrats on the new release, too!

Be sure to join the fun at the Facebook launch party where you may pick up a few new (free) books to read, or other giveaways from the many authors participating. And remember I’ll be partying on Thursday, 9/26, for Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Paranormal, and Time Travel day! See this post to find out more about the charm bracelet I’ll be giving away to one lucky partier.

Thanks for reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Nicki Greenwood #author #contemporary #PNR #NewAdult #romance #fiction #books

I think you’re going to enjoy my guest today! Please help me welcome, Nicki Greenwood! As usual we’ll start with her official bio, and then dip into what she has to say about her books and her process.

Nicki Greenwood graduated SUNY Morrisville with a degree in Natural Resources, which of course has nothing to do with writing novels. She has also worked in a bakery, an insurance agency, a flower shop, and a doctor’s office, which have nothing to do with writing, either. She did spend an awesome two years as an assistant editor for a publisher, and now does freelance editing on the side. Nicki still holds down a day job, which manages to get her out of the house once in a while. Since 2010, she has written eight novels, including the award-winning Gifted Series. Nicki lives in upstate New York with her husband, son, and assorted pets. If you can’t find her at her computer, you can always try the local Renaissance Faire.

You can learn more about Nicki at http://www.nickigreenwood.com, or follow her on Amazon, Facebook, or Twitter.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Nicki: Eight books of novel or short story length, and counting!

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Nicki: I began writing in the romance genre because it’s such a broad spectrum, from sweet, contemporary romance to spicy paranormals, and everything in between. There was a lot of room to play within the universal theme of a happy ending, and that appealed to me. I am now stretching my legs by writing in the New Adult genre, which is fresh and exciting. I have a planned trilogy currently in the works.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Nicki: I didn’t discover my “theme” until writing several books about it. I found that no matter what type of book I write, whether it’s contemporary, paranormal, or women’s fiction, the story always centers around a character finding his or her emotional home. In FIRE, my most recent release, the hero Ethan has never felt like he belonged anywhere. He is quite literally wandering the country in search of a place to belong. For him, it’s a matter of coming to terms with who—and what—he is.

Is love worth the risk of getting burned?

Ethan Sutter is good at running, but he can’t outrun himself. Rootless and reckless, he prowls the country, able to abandon everything except his hated Fire Elemental power. Then he lands in Pickering, Vermont, out of gas and out of options, and meets New Age curio shop owner Gypsy Ronan, an even bigger misfit than he is.

Gypsy knows Ethan is trouble. However, none of her tarot cards or tea leaves could have prepared her for their undoubtedly dangerous mutual attraction. More shocking still is the discovery that he possesses an incredible power, and he wants her help getting rid of it.

Ethan needs a normal life. He’s sure a woman like Gypsy couldn’t be part of it, but she sets his blood smoldering. Gypsy knows there’s more to Ethan than he admits, even as she fears for her heart.

Amazon

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Nicki: I purposely bought a laptop with a comfortable keyboard and long battery life so I can write in my office, at Starbucks, on lunch break at my day job, or wherever else I find myself. I used to write by hand, and then on a desktop computer, and finally discovered this is the best way for me to get the words down.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Nicki: Wednesday mornings are my Starbucks days, and I generally churn out the words over a green tea and breakfast sandwich with my headphones on. Something about the atmosphere encourages my muse to show up ready to work. I am a creature of habit, and these regular schedules work well for me. I write best in the mornings when I’m fresh, so unless I’m cramped for time I try to get my writing in as early as possible.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Nicki: I wouldn’t be where I am without the generous and supportive members of the Central New York Romance Writers. I owe a lot of my craft growth to them. I also have to give a shout out to The Wild Rose Press, who came on the scene when ebooks were just beginning to emerge. They have been a huge part of my success as an author, and I couldn’t ask for a nicer publisher.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Nicki: I love dialogue. It’s the first thing I notice in a book or television show, and one of the things I enjoy most about writing characters. The wittier the dialogue, the more fun it is!

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Nicki: Generally, a character shows up first. I don’t even brainstorm them, most of the time. They just begin “talking.” (We writers are among the few who can say we “hear voices” and not get strange looks…especially when talking to other writers. *grin*)

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Nicki: I do have a loose weekly “structure,” but it is sometimes undermined by family needs. Family is important, so when something comes up, I move my writing schedule. I am currently writing on a 100-words-per-day minimum, but I often surpass that. Occasionally, it’s a case of squeezing the writing in wherever I can.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Nicki: I am a hybrid pantser-plotter, somewhere between the author who outlines her story first, and the one who just sits down to write without a road map. This works for me most of the time, since I don’t like to know the end of a story before I write it.  There have been moments, however, where I get stuck. I call it “writing myself into a corner,” where I have set something up that ends in a snarl. When that happens I just keep going, and in the off hours when I’m not writing, my “passive muse” works on the problem until a solution crops up. Then I’m off writing again at a crazy pace.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Nicki: I don’t. It’s like dieting—if I call it a diet, I won’t do it. (Incidentally, I lost forty pounds over a six-month period by not calling it a diet.) Writing, like eating healthy, is a lifestyle, not a single event. I make more words by keeping at it daily than I ever would by pushing myself to do it in a standalone challenge.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Nicki: Julia Quinn is a perennial favorite, and I have recently delved into Erica Ridley’s work. I also chanced across A PRINCESS IN THEORY by Alyssa Cole, and devoured it. Cole’s voice is such fun. A DUKE BY DEFAULT is next on my list.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Nicki: Historical novels, especially romances. I may never write one, but I love to read them, whether they are Scottish, Regency, Egyptian, or something else.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Nicki: For one Valentine’s Day, I received a beautiful leather-bound copy of THE COMPLETE SHERLOCK HOLMES from my husband. It is one of my favorite possessions, and I am still working through it.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Nicki: I don’t read much while I am working on a book, but I treat myself to pleasure reading when I get to the end of my own works in progress. When I do read, if it isn’t a book on the craft of writing, it’s something historical.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Nicki: I wish I could write full time, but if that doesn’t happen, it’s all right. Getting out of the house and seeing other people is fuel for a writer’s brain. I am a pharmacy technician, and I love my co-workers, so it’s all good!

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Nicki: There’s room for every kind of story, with every kind of character, more now than ever. If you’re looking for a book that resonates with you, it’s out there—especially with the growth of indie publishing.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Nicki: Read, edit, learn craft, and don’t give up. There are so many books on the market, free or otherwise. In addition, you’re competing with entertainment streamers like Netflix, so you’d better learn to write a damn good book that’ll keep a reader’s attention. If you don’t polish your work, it shows. Readers recognize an amateur. You’re asking them to spend hard-earned money, so pay attention to the quality of your product. Don’t fall into the trap of assuming “good enough” is good enough, because they’ll look elsewhere for the next read…not to mention, you are doing your own craft a disservice by settling for “okay.” A thick skin is important, but remember that it grows over time. It’s all right to wallow in self-doubt for a day after a bad review, but don’t let it end your growth as a writer…because you never stop growing as a writer. It is a lifelong art.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Nicki: I don’t want to say too much until I have the books written, but I am working on a New Adult series with fresh voices and a different sort of tone. It’s been loads of fun so far, and I think readers are going to enjoy it.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Nicki: I have often wanted to try children’s books and screenplays. Perhaps when I’m certain I have a handle on writing New Adult stories, I’ll turn my attention to those genres!

Some very good advice in there, and some hints at interesting stories as well! Thanks so much for stopping by, Nicki.

Happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Pamela Gibson #contemporary #historical #romance #author #Regency #Western #mustread #fiction #books

Welcome to another guest author interview! Have you noticed how many authors write in more than one genre? Today I’d like to introduce you to another one who writes both contemporary and historical, Pamela Gibson. Let’s peruse her bio and then jump into the meat of the interview…

Author of eight books on California history and twelve romance novels, Pamela Gibson is a former City Manager who lives in the Nevada desert. Having spent several years messing about in boats, a hobby that included a five-thousand-mile trip in a 32-foot Nordic Tug, she now spends most of her time indoors happily reading, writing, cooking and keeping up with the antics of her gran-cats, gran-dog, and gran-fish. Her days as a white-knuckle cruising spouse may be over, but the balm of speed-eating chocolate kisses she developed during harrowing rides on frothy water lives on.

You can learn more about Pamela at https://www.pamelagibsonwrites.com, or keep up with her on Facebook  or Twitter.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Pamela: 12 romance novels

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Pamela: I first wrote in the contemporary genre because I was always told it was better to “write what you know.” Now I also write in two subgenres of historical romance. The first is the Regency period because I love the manners, the food, the clothes, and the historical events taking place. The second is the early California rancho period because I have some expertise in that romantic time period which has some surprising parallels to Regency England.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Pamela: If I had to choose a universal theme that is important to my story it would be faith versus doubt. This is a marriage of convenience trope. Gwen needs John to escape an unwanted suitor. John needs Gwen because he’s penniless and she comes with a dowry. They marry in haste, hoping to become friends. Gwen has faith that she can make any arrangement work. If not, at least she’ll be a mother, fulfilling her fondest hope. John is a doubter, afraid if he brings a child into the world it will be like his mother who is mad. He keeps his fears a secret, making Gwen think he doesn’t desire her. Can this misunderstanding be solved with a talk? Yes, and they have it, rather early in the book. Then Gwen shifts into doubting and John begins to be hopeful. Of course, they eventually work things out. It is a romance, after all.

Lady Gwendolyn Pettigrew longs to be a mother, but refuses to marry the lecherous old fool her father has found for her. When her best friend convinces her to consider her husband’s younger brother as a suitable candidate, Gwen agrees to a marriage of convenience, hoping against hope that her dream of becoming a mother will have a chance.

The Hon. John Montague, a penniless younger son, is handsome, witty, and thrilled that a woman with a dowry has agreed to wed him. Best of all she’s a fiercely independent bluestocking, a woman who won’t want to bother with a family. Because John has a shocking secret. He’s vowed never to bring a child into the world, a child who, like his own mother, might carry the strain of madness.

As secrets unfold, tension grows, threatening the fragile bonds they’ve forged.  Worse, someone wants them to abandon their home and leave Yorkshire, and they’ll stop at nothing to make it happen.

Amazon

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Pamela: I can write anywhere and had to do a lot of writing on our Nordic Tug while in port or at anchor. Now that we are land-based again, I write in a comfortable chair or on the couch in the early morning hours. Revisions are done in the same place.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Pamela: Because I am now a caregiver (sadly, my husband had a stroke and is partially disabled), I get up at dawn and write until he wakes up. Then I grab an hour or two during the day. By late afternoon, my brain turns off and I do other things.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Pamela: For many years I was a newspaper reporter, then went back to college, got a master’s degree in public administration, and began a career in city governance. Prior to retirement, I joined Romance Writers of America and began learning to write fiction. I have to say I learned the most from entering contests and getting feedback. Some judges gave excellent advice with examples. I treasure all of it.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Pamela: Dialogue has always been easy for me. The ability to put readers into the story is also a strength.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Pamela: I write in layers. First, I get the story on paper. Then I work on my characters and setting.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Pamela: I have to put my family first, but I’m usually the only one up at dawn, and that is my primary writing time.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Pamela: I love to write, but I hate the marketing part. Everyone has to do it, but I resist because it doesn’t come easy.

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Pamela: I’ve done a few NaNoWriMos and actually made it to 50,000 words once. I edited that book and self-published it. I think NaNoWriMo is easier for pantsers and I am definitely one of those.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Pamela: I’m currently reading Rebel by Beverly Jenkins. She has a wonderful grasp of history and I always learn so much while reading her books.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Pamela: My favorite genre is the Regency period and I do like books with a little mystery to them.

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Pamela: I keep Mary Balogh’s books because she hits so many emotional buttons. I am so envious. I also keep Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ books because of the care she puts into her craft.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Pamela: I have an extensive TBR list and I just read the next book in line. I read about 80 books a year (according to Goodreads).

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Pamela: I write full time because I am retired and because it is therapeutic to do something I really enjoy.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Pamela: With so many books available, it is very important to leave a review. Not everyone will, and that’s fine, but if you like a book, leaving a one or two sentence review helps an author get noticed. Readers’ opinions are important. I once changed one of my indie books based on consistent comments from readers who reviewed the original, but wanted it to be longer with a more developed relationship between the hero and his newly discovered son. That book was A Touch of Chardonnay.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Pamela: Before you query an agent or publisher, have that manuscript polished and professionally edited. If you decide to self-publish, you still need to at least hire a copyeditor. It’s worth it, especially when you are starting. Before I send anything to my editor I read my manuscript five or six times and always (I am not exaggerating) find a typo or dropped word. Reading aloud is also a good way to find things that need correcting.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Pamela: I’ve just completed a new novella in my Love in Wine Country series which I will self-publish in November. My second early California book, Return of the Fox, is with my Soulmate editor, and my third Regency, Scandal’s Promise, is underway. I like to keep busy.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Pamela: The novella I just finished is a mystery. I’ve never tried to do one before. I’m anxious to see how it is received. The other area I want to explore is middle grade fiction. I have a wonderful character in mind, but haven’t had time to work on it yet. There’s also a non-fiction book in my future, Confessions of a White-Knuckle Cruising Spouse. That five-thousand mile cruise my husband and I did in our 32-foot boat was a huge challenge for me. I learned so much about my own fears and my ability to cope during stressful situations. Others might enjoy my journey.

So Pamela has demonstrated she’s far braving than I am! I can’t imagine taking a 5K cruise in a boat. Write that book, Pamela! I bet you had an amazing adventure. Thanks for stopping by!

Happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Negeen Papehn #ownvoices #contemporary #romance #author #fiction #books

It’s time to meet an intriguing author, Negeen Papehn, who writes contemporary romance featuring Iranian main characters. We’ll start with her official bio, and then dive right into the interview so you can learn more about her books…

Negeen Papehn was born and raised in southern California, where she currently lives with her husband and two boys. She wasn’t always a writer. A graduate of USC dental school, Negeen spends half of her week with patients and the other half in front of her laptop. In the little time she finds in between, she loves to hang out with her boys, go wine tasting with her friends, throw parties, and relax with her family.

Her Forbidden Love series is currently out with City Owl Press.  You can learn more about her and her books at www.negeenpapehn.com, or follow her on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Negeen: I have written 4 full manuscripts and am currently working on the 5th. I currently have three of them published with City Owl Press. My Forbidden Love series.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Negeen: I write Contemporary Romance because I’m a “feels” junky. I love to take my readers on a roller coaster ride of emotions, where I make them fall in love and break their hearts, all at the same time. Some have said it’s exhausting to deal with all the feelings that are required when reading my books. I don’t take that as an insult, since it’s exactly what I’m going for. So if a reader picks up my stories, they should be ready to swoon, cry, have their hearts beat uncontrollably in their ribcage, and then have it ripped out of their chest and stomped on. But I promise, in the end, it’ll be worth it.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Negeen: My latest release involves the May-December romance trope. There’s a fifteen-year age gap between my MC and her love interest. This is the third book in my Forbidden Love series; each of the stories incorporate an obstacle that makes their romance “forbidden.”

All three of my MCs are also Iranian women, so the culture and the expectations of their families play a huge role in the stories. With this one, I wanted to find a theme that wouldn’t necessarily be an issue with the older population, like those in the other two books, but an issue with the younger generation of characters. I wanted to focus on a different perspective in this last one.

When love blossoms from the unexpected will the years between separate them forever?

On the outside, Bita appears to have it all under control. She’s a no-nonsense, strong-willed, force to be reckoned with. On the inside, though, she’s spent most of her life dealing with her pushy Iranian mother, ever concerned father, and overbearing younger brother.

But that’s all about to change.

Bita is determined to stand on her own two feet. She’s purchasing her first home, and ultimately, her independence. When Bita meets Ramtin, the sexy, older real estate agent, she gets more than she ever imagined. What was meant to be a simple property transaction, blooms into a fierce desire that leaves her breathless.

Now they must make their relationship work despite their fifteen-year age gap, and interference from their traditional families. Ramtin is everything she never knew she wanted, that is, until something unexpected becomes an all-or-nothing deal-breaker, and Ramtin may not be all in. Bita must decide what’s worth fighting for and if Ramtin is worth the final risk…losing her heart.

Amazon      Amazon Print:      GoodReads      City Owl Press

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Negeen: I usually write at home. More specifically, at my dining room table. I rarely have any designated writing time that is devoid of interruptions so it’s just become easier for me to station myself somewhere central. It allows me to deal with the multitude of needs, questions, and requests, my family continues to require of me while I’m authoring.

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Negeen: I don’t have any rituals that are a necessity for me to be able to write, but ideally, I’m in a pair of sweats or pajamas. The more comfortable I am, the more creative I become. I have a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, depending on the time of day, beside me. And there’s always music playing in my headphones, to drown out the noise going on around me.

If I could choose my most prolific time to write, it would be around 1pm. But sadly, once I start gaining momentum, it’s time to pick up my kids, or if I’m at work, the end of my lunch break.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Negeen: I’ve been called the “feels queen” by my critique partners because I LOVE to get into the nitty gritty of my characters’ emotions. I love them to be raw and real, make mistakes and bad choices. I strive to create characters that are authentic and humanly flawed. I’d say this is my biggest strength as a writer.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Negeen: Characters come first. Something will trigger their image in my mind then as more characters are formed, the situation begins to unfold.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Negeen: I honestly wish I had a structured writing time. I’d be much more prolific that way. But sadly, my real life doesn’t allow for that. I’m a mom of two boys, ten and twelve, who have an abundance of extracurricular activities, as well as, are more dependent on me than they should be. There’s always a mound of responsibilities that come with the house and life in general. I’m also a dentist half the week. Time is not something I find enough of, so I’ve trained myself to write in the in betweens. Which means, if I have five minutes, then I use them to write. I write in the hour I have before picking up the boys, in between helping with homework, while I wait for patients to go numb, on my lunchbreaks, and late at night if I can keep my eyes open. I’ve gotten really good at stopping mid-thought and picking right back up, whether it’s a few minutes, hours, or even days later.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Imposter syndrome. It’s a real thing, and I think all writers can identify. When I first dive into a story, I’m almost lost in the pieces, trying to stitch them together in a way that makes sense. I find myself asking “what’s the point,” and “will anyone even care,” about my storyline, my characters, their struggles. I love to create love stories, but I always feel like there has to be more. Some other factor that runs alongside the couples’ evolution, adding another layer to their struggles. So I’m always wondering if I’m getting it right and if my stories will resonate with readers, or if I’m just some lucky woman who published some books on a fluke and soon the world will see that I’m just a sham. I battle my own insecurities all of the time. And sometimes, it hinders my ability to write.

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Negeen: The beauty about being an author is that I get a first-hand peek at work that has yet to hit the stands. I’m currently reading the first book in the series, A Court of Gods and Witches, by Melissa Sercia, a fellow City Owl Press author. It’s urban fantasy and I’m totally digging it.

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Negeen: I love Paranormal Romance as well as Urban Fantasy. But I read a wide variety of genres, to be honest. I don’t know if I have an actual favorite but I do prefer that there are heavy romantic elements in whatever story I’m reading.

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Negeen: When I’m writing, I read in my genre. I feel like it helps me get more into the romantic mindset I need to fully develop my own stories. But once I’m done, I usually take at least a month hiatus from writing, and during those times, I read something completely different.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Negeen: I wish I wrote full time! But most of us do and very few of us get to. Half the week, I’m a dentist. But writing is my happy place, so a lot of times you’ll find me in my office, on my laptop, in between patients.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Negeen: It’s hard! As a reader, I never really understood how much sweat and tears go into writing a novel. And that’s the easy part. Everything that comes afterwards is emotionally draining and hard to sustain sanity through. The ups and downs of the publishing process, the querying, getting and agent or editor, revising over and over again, doubting everything you do until all you want to do is hide in a corner and cry, are tedious at best. So much goes into the book before a reader can hold it in their hands. So if you love someone’s work, then yell it from the rooftops because we really need the encouragement. And if you hate it, that’s okay too, but be kind in the way you talk about it because that’s someone’s hopes and dreams your discussing.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Negeen: Hang in there. Keep writing. Try and not doubt yourself to the point of no return. No one can tell your story other than you. So tell it, love it, pour your heart into it, and don’t lose faith, even if it feels like the world doesn’t get it like you do.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Negeen: I’ve just started a new manuscript, one I’m hoping to shape into a series. I’m Iranian and so I love to do own voices when I create characters. All my MCs are Persian women of varying ages and stages in their lives. It’s my way of shedding some positive light on my culture. My most recent story follows Darya, a thirty-year-old ER doctor whose path crosses with a Latin superstar. He’s nothing like she expected and she’s forced to question her biases as she tries to figure out what she really wants, while pushing against the limits created by her upbringing. And then there’s a whole other emotionally charged story line happening simultaneously because, well, I can’t just leave a romance as a romance. 

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Negeen: I would love to dip into urban fantasy. I’m fascinated with that type of world building and I’d love to have characters with hidden identities and powers. I’d still probably gear it in the romance direction because I can’t imagine writing anything that didn’t have heavy romantic subplots.

Sounds like some really interesting stories to explore and tell, Negeen. Thanks for sharing your writing process and insights with us.

Happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Addison Brae #author #thriller #mystery #romantic #suspense #fiction #books

I’d like to introduce you all to an author who wants some mystery or suspense in with her romance: Addison Brae. Welcome! Let’s find out a bit more about her via her professional bio and then we’ll move right into the interview.

Addison Brae lives in Dallas, Texas on the edge of downtown. As a child, she was constantly in trouble for hiding under the bed to read when she was supposed to be napping. She has been writing since childhood starting with diaries, letters and short stories. She continues today with articles, video scripts and other content as an independent marketing consultant.

When she’s not writing, Addison spends her time traveling the world, collecting interesting cocktail recipes and hosting parties. She’s still addicted to reading and enjoys jogging in her neighborhood park, sipping red wine, binge-watching TV series, vintage clothing and hanging out with her artistic other half and their neurotic cat Lucy.

You can learn more about her at addisonbrae.com. Find Addison on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Sign up at addisonbrae.com/contact to receive a text message when her next book is released.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Addison: The genres that call to me are always contemporary because my mind lives in the present day. Thrillers and mysteries in book, movie or TV form are my all-time favorites. I love action, so I also write romantic suspense with a thriller/mystery twist.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Addison: Readers will always find a strong female heroine in my books. These women have fought to get past physical or emotional abuse or extreme control. For anyone who knows someone who’s fought these demons or if you have yourself, you understand how difficult it is to become strong and self-confident. Gillian, the heroine in Becker Circle, is on the journey to forget what happened in the past, not repeat it, and become the badass she knows she can be. 

My first and only boyfriend believed I was too gutless to leave. He was dead wrong. My name’s Gillian, and I graduated Harvard early and left his hot temper and everyone else behind for Dallas. Determined to make it on my own, I land a second job bartending at the neighborhood pub smack in drama central where most every jerk in the neighborhood hits on me—at a huge price.

A week into the job, the neighborhood’s very popular drug dealer falls to his death a few feet from the table I’m serving. The cops say suicide, but the hot guitar player in the house band and I suspect foul play, and I intend to prove it. We dig deeper, grow closer, and make a shocking discovery. We know the murderer. Watch the trailer.

You can find Becker Circle, named a 2019 Raven Awards finalist in mystery/suspense, on Amazon ($0.99 September 5-10, 2019), B&N, Apple Books, Kobo, and Smashwords.

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Addison: The most inspiring places for me to write or revise are where scenes take place. Since Becker Circle is about a part-time bartender, most of it takes place in bars. I wrote much of the manuscript observing bartenders as they work and interact with customers. I also enjoy writing on our rooftop deck overlooking the beautiful Dallas skyline. There’s one place I don’t do my best thinking—at my desk on my work computer.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Addison: There’s an amazing group of badass women I’m lucky enough to know from my membership and work with the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. I didn’t just join. I got involved and led my chapter and attended conferences and workshops, which is how I met these women. We help each other learn to become better writers, build each other’s confidence, and never give up. Tirgearr Publishing, which published Becker Circle, and I connected on Twitter via #PitMad. Luck was on my side that day.  

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Addison: This is a hard question to answer about my own writing. According to the reviews, readers respond most to the vivid, realistic characters, settings and storytelling. The characters make big mistakes to which we can all relate, and there’s always a kickass heroine who’s caught up in the action.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Addison: I think about the characters for an eternity before I write anything down. The first thing I type is a short synopsis so I know there’s an interesting plot the cast of characters in my head can play out. Then I start writing.

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Addison: My natural instinct is to write in first person, present tense because I very much like to live in the moment. That means the page only shows what the main character knows. The struggle in a thriller, mystery, or suspense is keeping track of who knows what. I challenge myself to write this way because many readers like the suspense of the story unfolding along with the main character, which can make it even more rewarding to escape into a fictional world. 

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Addison: There’s honestly no favorite genres. I’m a book junkie. I love thrillers, contemporary, science fiction, fantasy, and non-fiction—targeted to adults or young adults.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Addison: Absolutely! Unfortunately writing novels wouldn’t pay for the shoes, vintage clothes, and travel I enjoy, so I’m a public relations and marketing consultant by day. I advise on strategy and write articles, video scripts, news releases, and web content for corporate clients. With fiction, it’s freeing to create my own stories and characters without having to get a zillion approvals.

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Addison: Many people think books should be super cheap or free. But these readers don’t know how much work and hundreds of hours multiple people put into to creating those electronic or paper pages. Authors spend a year or more writing and revising each book. Then some authors have an agent to help them find a publisher. Others work directly with the publisher. The publisher edits, designs an original cover, and then formats, prints, distributes, and markets the books. The small amount of money people pay to purchase a book puts food on these people’s tables and pays for the roof over our heads. We hope people will continue to buy and read books! 

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Addison: Writing is a team sport. People often write in solitude. Join a writing organization and a critique group to get out of your space, your comfort zone to learn, share, network and become an even better, more connected writer.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Addison: I just finished the nail-biting stage of writing the climax to the Becker Circle sequel. Now I’m revising before handing the manuscript over to my publisher. The story picks up where Becker Circle left off with many of the same characters readers love and hate. The fun part is bringing in a really edgy cybercrime angle—cryptojacking (that’s pickpocketing digital currency). Some authors, like me, feel every painful heartache and joyous emotion their characters experience. This one takes a lot out of me to write, which is a good sign that readers may enjoy it.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Addison: Since my day job has me writing about how businesses can use artificial intelligence, it launched a fascinating idea brewing in my head that could be speculative fiction. 

Thanks for stopping by to share your writing process and your thoughts on the world of publishing books!

I love that Addison writes in the locations of her stories. The immediacy of setting as well as the visual details of the people working in those settings must bring those scenes to life.

Until next time, happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.

Getting to know Patricia Sargeant #author #romance #mystery #weddings #secondchance #mustread #fiction

I’m pleased to introduce my next interview guinea pig guest, Patricia Sargeant. She’s an award-winning author of both romance and mysteries. Let’s find out more about her, shall we?

Patricia Sargeant is a national best-selling, award-winning author of romance and mysteries. Her work has been featured in national publications such as Publishers WeeklyUSA TodayKirkus ReviewsSuspense MagazineMystery Scene MagazineLibrary Journal and RT Book Reviews. For more information about Patricia and her work, visit PatriciaSargeant.com.

You can find out more about her and her stories at www.PatriciaSargeant.com, or follower her on Facebook or Twitter.

Betty: How many books have you written and published?

Patricia: Hi, Betty! Thank you so very much for this opportunity to meet your community. I’m super excited.

I’ve published 23 books. My 23rd book, A Groom Once Again: Meet the Bridegrooms, Novella 2, was a May 2019 release. My 24th book, A Groom Worth the Wait: Meet the Bridegrooms, Novella 3, is a September 2019 release and completes the Bridegrooms novella trilogy, which started in January 2019 with A Groom to the Altar: Meet the Bridegrooms, Novella 1.

Betty: What genre(s) do you write in and why?

Patricia: I write mysteries as Olivia Matthews and as Patricia Sargeant, and I write romance as Patricia Sargeant and Regina Hart.

I write romance because I enjoy exploring how finding your soul mate can help further develop – perhaps stimulate – the best in us. I love that premise. Even in my mysteries, I often include romantic interests.

I enjoy writing mysteries because I absolutely love puzzles.

Betty: What themes or motifs did you use in your recent release and why were they important to your story?

Patricia: Ooh, I love this question! A Groom Once Again is a second-chance-at-love story. Its theme is love languages. I fiercely believe that communication is the foundation of all relationships – personal and professional. If you have a weak foundation, your relationship will crumble. To communicate effectively, we have to put ourselves in the seat of the person with whom we’re communicating. Ask ourselves, “How can I make them hear me? How can I get them to understand how X makes me feel or why Y is important to me?” In A Groom Once Again, Asher and Zora’s marriage failed because they weren’t communicating. Specifically, they didn’t recognize each other’s love language. If they want to reconcile, they’ll need to recognize and understand each other’s love language. Are they willing to put in that work?

Cynical screenwriter Asher Tomlin needs help with the script for his company’s historical documentary. Before their divorce almost three years ago, Asher and his ex-wife had made an impressive scriptwriting team. Now Asher’s two best friends urge him to turn to her again. Asher doesn’t need much prodding, though, to commit to doing whatever it takes to reunite with his ex-wife.

The clock is ticking for jaded editorial consultant Zora Dabney. Her biological clock, that is. While they were married, she and Asher had agreed to have children. Now she’s divorced and childless. So when Asher asks for help creating the script for his documentary, Zora tests his claim that he’s willing to do whatever it takes to get her to work with him.

If Asher and Zora find a way to collaborate on the script, can they also find a way back to the altar?

Buy A Copy

Betty: Do you have a specific place that you write? Revise?

Patricia: I outline, write and revise in a home office with a dictionary and a style guide close to hand. Ha!

Betty: Do you have any writing rituals while you write? Did you have a special drink, or music, or time of day that you gravitated toward?

Patricia: I really prefer to write in the early morning. It feels like such a special, magical time of day.

Betty: What helped you move from unpublished to published? A mentor or organization or something else?

Patricia: My family and Romance Writers of America helped me to move from being unpublished to my dream of becoming a published author. My family helped by not allowing me to give up on my dream. They believed in me even when I didn’t believe in myself. It’s almost as though they willed me to continue to believe that my dream of being published would become a reality. Romance Writers of America helped me by educating me on what I needed to know about the craft and business of writing, and by giving me access to the businesses and agencies that would help me realize my dream. I’m forever grateful to both.

Betty: What do you think is your greatest strength in your writing?

Patricia: I think my imagination is my greatest strength. As storytellers we have to continually feed our imaginations, keep it fresh and different. Challenge ourselves. We can’t allow ourselves to get into ruts.

Betty: What comes first when you’re brainstorming a new story: setting, situation, characters?

Patricia: Oh, the characters! I truly believe that characters are the story – what they desire; what they fear; the obstacles they face and/or create; the people with whom they surround themselves. Those are some of the things that drive the story.

Betty: Do you have a structured time to write or is more fluid/flexible? Do you have to write between family obligations or do you set aside a block of time?

Patricia: LOL! Oh, my word! This is another exceptionally great question. Have you heard, “We plan, God laughs.”? I believe God has deep belly laughs at my plans to set aside a block of time to write. This is another reason I prefer to write during the wee hours of the morning. It’s a “special, magical” time because there’s less chance of being interrupted. LOL!

Betty: What is one recent struggle you’ve experienced in your writing?

Patricia: Historical research. Meet the Bridegrooms is a *contemporary* novella trilogy, but the characters are working on a historical documentary. Oh, my word! Historical research is not for the faint of heart. This is me giving historical authors a standing ovation and expressing gratitude from the bottom of my heart. *applause!!!!!*

Betty: Do you participate in NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month)? Why or why not?

Patricia: Yes, I do! It provides that extra bit of motivation to focus exclusively on the writing – whether it’s an outline, a first draft or a revision. I start getting super excited around August. Ha! I’ll let you know if I ever make my NaNoWriMo goal. LOL!

Betty: What are you reading right now?

Patricia: Right now, I’m reading Land of Shadows by Rachel Howzell Hall. It’s a mainstream mystery and the storytelling is *stellar.*

Betty: What is your favorite genre to read?

Patricia: Oooh! That’s such a hard question. Um, … OK! For today, I’ll say romance. I love mysteries, sci-fi, fantasy and current events. But for today, I’ll say my favorite genre to read is romance. If you ask me tomorrow, please don’t call me a liar if my answer isn’t the same. LOL!

Betty: What are your keeper books? How often might you reread them?

Patricia: Unfortunately, I don’t have as much time to reread my keeper books anymore. (A moment of silence as I wipe the tears from my eyes.) I used to reread my keeper books two, three, four times. It felt like going back to a party where everyone knew you and love filled the room. Good times!

Betty: When you’re writing, do you read in the same genre as your work in progress or something else?

Patricia: I usually read genres outside of my work-in-progress. Actually, while I’m writing a story, I usually read research books and magazines.

Betty: Do you have a “day job” or do you write full time?

Patricia: Since being unceremoniously laid off and unable to find a comparable position with a new company, I’ve been trying to make this writing dream a reality. Wish me luck! Ha!

Betty: What do you wish readers knew about the publishing industry?

Patricia: Whoa. There are a lot of things I wish readers were told about the publishing industry. But for today, I’ll say that I wish readers better understood their own power. It seems the publishing industry makes decisions based on anecdotes and those anecdotes impact everyone’s reading experience. *Readers* should drive the reading experience. If there are stories readers want to see more of, they should let publishers know. If there are themes they want to see published, they should let publishers know. We shouldn’t have to accept only what publishers serve us; *readers* should set the menu.

Betty: What advice do you have for new writers?

Patricia: Two bits of advice come to mind for new writers. First, never stop developing your craft. It’s important to strive to deliver your best possible work. Second, never stop learning the business of writing. This industry changes so quickly. (Oops! There’s another change!) Writing is an art, but it’s also a business and, if you want to succeed, you have to treat it like a business.

Betty: Any hints of what you’re next writing project might be?

Patricia: Well, no need to twist my arm. LOL! As I mentioned, I’m wrapping up my Meet the Bridegrooms novella trilogy next month, September, with A Groom Worth the Wait. After that, my November release is a contemporary romance novel, A Wedding Gamble, which completes my Anderson Family contemporary romance trilogy, which started with Harlequin’s The Love Game and Passion Play. Thanks to the magic of indie pubbing, I’m able to bring closure to that series. I’m quite excited.

Betty: What kind of writing would you like to experiment with? Or what’s a different genre you’ve considered writing but haven’t yet?

Patricia: I would love, love, love to publish my sci-fi/fantasy! Fingers and toes crossed that I’m able to do that.

Betty, thank you again so very much for this opportunity to chat with your community. It’s been fun! Very best wishes to you for your continued success!

Thanks for sharing about your writing process, Patricia! Wishing you all the best with your career!

Happy reading!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I send out most every month, including news like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers, along with recipes and writing progress. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit www.bettybolte.com for more on my books and upcoming events.