Tasty Tuesday: Traditional Lamb Stew #dinner #recipe from #romance #author Cara Marsi

Last week I talked about how I learned I enjoy eating lamb. This week, Cara Marsi is going to share how her character fell in love over lamb stew.

cara-marsi-enhanced


Thanks, Betty! In A Catered Romance, when Mary Beth explains to Tom that the lamb stew is for an engagement party for a couple who’d had lamb stew on their first date, Tom says that’s romantic. Mary Beth answers that she no longer believes in romance. Since Tom broke her heart once, this helps set up some of the conflict.

Traditional Lamb Stew

TOTAL TIME: Prep: 10 min. Cook: 1 hour

MAKES: 4 servings

Ingredients

1-1/2 pounds lamb stew meat

2 tablespoons olive oil, divided

3 large onions, quartered

3 medium carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces

4 small potatoes, peeled and cubed

1 can (14-1/2 ounces) beef broth

1 teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon all-purpose flour

1-1/2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley

1-1/2 teaspoons minced chives

½ teaspoon minced fresh thyme

Directions

In a Dutch oven, brown meat in 1 tablespoon oil over medium heat until meat is no longer pink. Remove with a slotted spoon; set aside. Add the onions, carrots and remaining oil to pan. Cook for 5 minutes or until onions are tender, stirring occasionally. Add the potatoes, broth, salt, pepper and lamb; Bring to a boil.

Remove from the heat. Cover and bake at 350° for 50-60 minutes or until meat and vegetables are tender.

With a slotted spoon, remove meat and vegetables to a large bowl; set aside and keep warm. Pour pan juices into another bowl; set aside.

In the Dutch oven, melt butter over medium heat. Stir in flour until smooth. Gradually whisk in pan juices. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes or until thickened. Stir in the parsley, chives, thyme, and meat and vegetables; heat through. Yield: 4 servings.

a-catered-romace-resized-for-sw-goodIn A Catered Romance, Mary Beth tells Tom she likes to roast the lamb first. You can do that if you want. Roast the lamb with some of the broth for about an hour, either the full roast or the cut-up pieces. Season as you like. Let the lamb cool before you cut it up. Follow the rest of the instructions. Also, you’ll probably want to double the broth and double the spices. I find that recipes are never quite spicy enough for me, and the amount of broth used in this recipe isn’t enough. Experiment. That’s what I do.

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I love to experiment with recipes, adapting them to our tastes. Thanks for sharing that amazing recipe for lamb stew, Cara! I’m always up for a new tempting lamb recipe, especially one so integral to a romance story. After all, we all have to eat, right?

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit my Website for more on my books and upcoming events.

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Tasty Tuesday: Conkies #dessert #recipe from #romance #author Sandra Masters

Tasty Tuesday has arrived along with a decadent dessert recipe from Barbados by author Sandra Masters. Take it away, Sandra!


sandra_2014-50-percent-picturea-3Many thanks to Betty Bolte for offering me the opportunity to post on this blog. Many of my books feature recipes relevant for either my hero or heroine.

In this case, the Conkies are a favorite of my hero, Thorn Wick, THORN, SON OF A DUKE, as a young West Indies native who finds himself summoned to England to meet his father, The Duke of Althorn.

This 15,000-word prequel teaser is Book Three in The Duke Series. This story covers the hard life Thorn, and his mother has on the island of Barbados, where he’s considered a half-breed, even though his mother is descendent of the royalty of the Taino Tribe. She dies in his arms and tells him of his heritage and swears him to promise he will visit his father, the Duke of Althorn, who never knew of his existence.

The story covers Thorn’s trip from Barbados to London, England, and the rather large chip on his shoulder at the stunning revelation that he is a son of a prominent Duke. His father’s best friend, Sir Tomas, transports him and explains that the Duke never knew of his son’s existence, but that he wants him now that he knows.

A short excerpt:

“Sir Tomas, how long did you say you resided in Barbados when you first came?”

“About four months.”

“Just enough time to get a taste of our food?”

“Yes, my favorite was Cou Cou, Cornmeal, and Okra.”

Thorn smiled. “I especially like Conkies. It is a favorite treat.”….The thought of his beloved island rained over him. He closed his eyes for a moment and then relaxed. “What does my father look like?” he asked.

“Very much like you, but with a lighter skin color. You both have the same eyes. I’d know you anywhere in the world.”

thorn-cover-ok-use-thisThe last chapter of this prequel fast-forwards three years where Thorn meets the Duke’s ward, Alicia, and the twenty-one-year-old hero admires her from afar. The chemistry sizzles. Her fire, His ice, Collision bound.

Alicia’s and Thorn’s multi-cultural story continues in Book Four, THE DUKE’S MAGNIFICENT BASTARD by Sandra Masters, with a release date of November 4, 2016. Available at Amazon for pre-order now.

I include recipes in most of my books and those recipes can be found on my website. http://sandramastersauthor.com. If you’re worried about carbohydrates, you might skip this recipe, but it sounds decadently delicious.

Recipe for Conkies (Barbados)

Ingredients:

2 cups corn flour                                                                                            1 egg (beaten)

1 cup plain flour                                                                                             ¾ lb brown sugar

I cup grated coconut                                                                                      4 ozs raisins

¾ lb grated pumpkin                                                                                    1 tsp spice

½ lb grated sweet potato                                                                             1 tsp almond essence

6 oz melted butter or margarine                                                                1 tsp grated nutmeg

1 cup whole milk                                                                                              1 tsp salt

Fresh banana leaves

Substitutions: The Banana leaves can be substituted with wax paper or foil.

Mix the coconut, pumpkin, sweet potato, sugar, spices, raisins, flour, corn flour, and salt together in a large bowl.

Add the beaten egg, melted butter/margarine, and milk. Mix thoroughly by hand to combine. You should have a thick mixture that drops slowly from a spoon. Add more flour if the mixture is not thick enough. Add a bit more milk, if it is too thick

Fresh green Banana leaves are traditionally used to wrap the Conkie mixture. If you have these, strip leaves from the stalk with a sharp knife, then briefly singe them over an open flame to make them more pliable. Cut the leaves into individual 8” squares.  Spoon 2 to 3 tablespoons of the mixture into the center of the banana leaf. Fold the leaf around the mixture, taking care not to rip the leaf.

Steam the Conies on a rack over boiling water in a large saucepan for 1 hour or until they are firm.

Unwrap and enjoy!

Recipe Compliments of Barbados.Org


Wow to both the story and the Conkies! Did you find that recipe as tempting as I do? Thanks again, Sandra, for sharing your amazing recipe with us! I think I put on weight just reading the list of ingredients!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Visit my Website for more on my books and upcoming events.

Between the Lines: She wrote what? #American #women #history #research

Ann Frobel CW DiaryThe inspiration for the A More Perfect Union series of historical romances came from reading early American literature. An essay by Judith Sargent Murray, specifically, in which she argued for equal education for girls, and argued against the mistaken notion that females would become sick with too much education. Looking back on how our understanding of human capabilities has morphed over time, it’s difficult to imagine anyone would believe the brain couldn’t learn without making the person—female, that is—ill.

One symptom of this idea is the denial of women to write for publication without being criticized for “manly” behavior. But by the end of the American Revolution women had started to write for publication. Even young slave Phillis Wheatley wrote poems and had them published.

One thing I’ve noticed in my research is the expansion of available written materials for women’s lives over the last 240 years of our country’s existence. What’s interesting to me is that the earliest written record is usually in the form of letters between women and their friends and family. Few colonial women had the time, the materials, or perhaps even the interest in documenting their day-to-day existence in a diary. I can think of one that is famous for the very fact that it was written by a lady in South Carolina during the Revolution. Add to the dearth of materials available the fact that these women often had a sense of privacy they held dear. Which often led women to burn their letters before they died, like Martha Washington is known to have done. (Sadly…)

Mary Chesnut CW DiaryBy the time of the Civil War, however, it’s easier to find the histories of women. For example, both Mary Chesnut, wife of a Confederate general, and Anne Frobel, a Virginia lady, kept diaries specifically to document their lives during the conflict, recognizing that others may actually want to know what they had to endure after the fact. Which they were indeed correct to presume!

I found myself pondering the expansion of women writers of all kinds over the centuries. From writing letters, to keeping diaries, to writing essays and novels and nonfiction books, to the vast array of writing we enjoy today. Even this blog is an example of a woman voicing her thoughts to others. I think all this stems from women having more education, less manual labor around the house, more “leisure” time as a result. (Note that although I’m calling it leisure time, we all know that most people fill every waking hour with something to do!) And of course, the materials are always at hand, whether it’s paper and pen or some form of keyboard. But also because women are people who have a voice and thoughts worth sharing.

So I thank those courageous women like Judith Sargent Murray who stood up to be counted and helped to open the door to the world of writing I enjoy today.

Thanks for stopping by!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

My American Revolution series of romances begins with Emily’s Vow, which was a finalist in the 2015 International Book Awards contest. The stories each feature a strong woman who declares her own independence for a variety of reasons, but ultimately they each find and fall in love with their soul mate. You can purchase the 4-book series for Kindle, or for Nook. They are also available in paperback if you prefer. Happy reading!

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Between the Lines: Sermon with a View #romance #research #churches

IMG_1508Last week I shared about the pulpit in St. Michael’s Church in Charleston, South Carolina. Today, I’d like to share the description of the chancel and nave in the church, and then let you see it through Emily’s eyes, as I wrote it in Emily’s Vow. Like I mentioned last time, George W. Williams wrote and published a bicentennial account of the history of the church, complete with descriptions and, even better, pictures. I’m going to refer to his pages again.

Each of us notices different aspects of the world around us. So I had to “become” Emily when I wrote her story, to show what she’d focus on in the church while listening to the dreaded loyalist rector’s sermon. All she really wanted was to leave the church, but her father would never allow such disrespect on the Sabbath. So she sits still, with an effort, and endures the lesson.

I’ll touch on the history of the interior of the church, for your information, and then I’ll share the description I used in the book, so you can see how I worked in the details from Emily’s perspective.

IMG_1527According to Mr. Williams, the chancel is “Architecturally as well as devotionally the focus of attention” in the church. Thus, the design and decoration of the space received the most attention. In 1772, Corinthian pilasters and a wrought iron rail were added to the area at the front of the church. The chancel is described in great detail in the pages of Mr. Williams’ book.

From St. Michael’s, Charleston, 1751-1951:

“The Chancel is handsome, and is ornamented in a neat and appropriate manner. It is a paneled wainscot, with four Corinthian Pilasters supporting the proper cornice. The usual Tables of the Decalogue, Lord’s Prayer, and Apostles’ Creed, are placed between them.”

And then:

“It seems that then or later the wainscot, the pilasters, and the entablature may have been painted a dark brown against a solid plaster wall, quite possibly blue. The tablets, two to each side in a unit, were in gilded frames with gilt lettering. Decorating the head of each frame was a golden cherub’s head and wings. The half-dome was a thing of simplicity and beauty. It was blue, representing the firmament, with clouds floating in it. At the peak was a ‘glory,’ a golden sun with golden beams radiating into the dome. The entire aspect must have been at once handsome and harmonious.”

The details of this description informed what Emily notices as she gazes about the church. But there are changes that have been made to the church in the years since my story took place, which Mr. Williams notes.

Again from Williams:

“A dwelling immediately to the east of the chancel offered the constant threat of fire to the church, and in 1788 the dignified Palladian window was ‘shut in with brick.’ The large blank area in the chancel thus produced was painted over a dark brown to resemble a curtain and draperies with gilt tassels and fringe.”

Over the years, other changes occurred, such as repainting and regilding, and repairs had to be made after the Civil War when “damage inflicted by Shells” had to be corrected, but the interior was restored “in keeping with the original design.” Then in 1866, the central window was reopened and “filled with colored glass of hexagonal panes with a curling ivy-leaf design.” Not to belabor my point, I’m sharing these details on the changes to show how having the historical description of what the chancel and nave looked like originally and in 1782-83, the years of my A More Perfect Union series, allowed me to accurately reflect on their appearance.

With that detailed description in mind, let’s look at how Emily viewed the chancel and nave in Emily’s Vow:

“She let her eyes stray to the white plaster ceiling with its intricately carved border known as the Wall of Troy, with its four double roses centered on each of four sides of the rectangle above her. She tried projecting the piety of the other women surrounding her though she only wanted to move, to be outside in the sunshine, to dissipate the energy agitating her. The nave felt cool in the dim light. The sun shone through the Palladian glass window at the rear of the chancel, situated some twenty feet behind the pulpit, and brightened the dark blue walls as well as the four brown Corinthian pilaster columns. The half dome above was blue to represent the firmament with white clouds floating on it and a “glory” at the peak, a golden sun with radiating beams spreading across the dome. Two tablets hung on either side of the window containing the words of the Ten Commandments, the Lord’s Prayer and the Apostles Creed in gilt lettering in gilded frames with a golden cherub’s head and wings at the top. She appreciated the simple elegance of the chancel, but today she had no patience. None.

Outside, the sun shone warmly on the churchyard with its tombstones covered by fallen leaves, and she imagined birds hopped among them searching for dinner. But she remained trapped inside yet again, albeit in a different place.”

Poor Emily! She wants to enjoy the service, but simply misses the familiar rector who fled when the British occupied the city. But don’t worry. She’ll once again go willingly to church, after the enemy departs America’s shores in December 1782.

Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and opinions!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Emily's Vow Finalist SealAnd of course, if you’d like your own copy of Emily’s Vow, you can buy it at the following links. Thanks!

Barnes and Noble: http://bit.ly/1wZML3a

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Between the Lines: Word Search in History #research #wordplay #amwriting

I was talking with a friend about my love of word play, including checking on the etymology of words in my stories to make sure they are not anachronisms for my characters. See, when writing in close point of view, either first or third person, the characters thoughts and speech must adhere to the language in use at the time period of the story. For example, words like mesmerize or trampoline were unknown in the 18th century, the time of my historical romance series.

This discussion reminded me of when I was researching the history of the bells of St. Michael’s Church in Charleston, South Carolina, for Emily’s Vow. During my reading, I came across the fact that the bells had been taken down and shipped to England as war prizes by the British in October 1782 (which was a story problem I had to correct, by the way). But also that the bells were returned the following fall on a ship that also carried two thoroughbred horses. Nothing too unusual about that fact, right? Except! The word thoroughbred was used to refer to a person with good breeding up until 1796, when it was then applied to horses. My story takes place in 1782, so while my historical reference on the history of the bells could use that word, I could not include it in any of my stories set in this time period.

FireproofpicWhat to do? How did people of the day refer to what we know today as Thoroughbreds? I needed to see the newspaper account from 1783 to find out what terminology the contemporary writer used. So while I was in Charleston, hubby and I visited the Fireproof Building that houses The South Carolina Historical Society. Armed with the citation of the exact newspaper publication information, the wonderful librarians there helped me locate the article. My heart raced with anticipation as I scanned the column of text. The search for a tidbit of history such as this is thrilling to me, which is why I write historicals.

 

Darley_Arabian
The Darley Arabian – Image courtesy of Wikipedia

Finally, I found the sentence referring to “thorough bred horses.” Two words! Awesome! That meant I could use the 1782 term and modern readers would still understand the meaning. Ultimately, the reader’s enjoyment of the story outweighs other considerations, but if I can use the language of the day that my character would use, all the better.

 

What do you think? Does it matter how authentic the language is as long as the story is entertaining? Or do you prefer to experience the subtle distinctions in time and place that language can create?

Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and opinions!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Emily's Vow Finalist SealIf you’d like to grab a copy of Emily’s Vow for yourself, here’s where you can find it:

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Between the Lines: Breastfeeding in the 18th century #research #history #motherhood

Often it’s the smallest details that take the most time to research. Evelyn has an infant son whom she is breastfeeding. But my question was, how did she dress in order to do so? I mean, women wore a chemise and stays or a bodice of some sort. There were several layers of fabric to contend with. Today, we have blouses with buttons, specialized bras, and other options for making nursing our children convenient and discreet. But then? What did they wear?

motherhood_thumbIt took some searching, but I finally found what I was looking for. Again, at the Colonial Williamsburg website, one of my go-to sites for 18th-century research. Not only did they include the description of stays with flaps on the breast to make access possible, but they also revealed how they handled diapering – and pinning – the cloth diapers on their babies. There is most definitely a reason why safety pins were invented! I think the most

motherhood1-Colonial Williamsburg
A pin cushion with straight pins was a common new baby gift. Image courtesy of Colonial Williamsburg.

creative idea was sewing on ties so they could fasten the cloth diaper without any pins. And the addition of a pad made of more absorbent material for the night to augment the natural absorbency of the soft cotton.

 

So, in Evelyn’s Promise, I had Evelyn become creative and sewed flaps onto her gown so she could discreetly feed her son. I was also heartened to read that women in this time period were engaged in feeding their own children unlike subsequent eras when they employed wet nurses instead, not just to fill in from time to time.

Being able to share the details of how women cared for their children and themselves helps me more accurately tell the stories about life in America’s past.

Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and opinions!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Evelyn's PromiseIf you’re interested in buying your own copy of Evelyn’s Promise, you can find her story at the following links. Thanks!

B&N: http://bit.ly/1SCcwTJ

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Between the Lines: Planning Her Escape Route #research #history #amwriting

She needed to flee but to where? That question had me searching the historic records for a place for Evelyn, along with Nathaniel, to move at the end of Evelyn’s Promise. Somewhere on the new frontier, now that the American Revolution had ended. Somewhere dangerous yet appealing to the adventurous and courageous. Somewhere her friends and family would object to her attempting to make the arduous journey.

 

Yazoo-Georgia_Controversy
Image courtesy of Wikipedia

After some digging, I found the Yazoo Lands and the ensuing land scandal. The area encompasses what is now northern Alabama and was largely inhabited by Indians, or the ancestors of the people today we call Native Americans. The area only sparsely had white people settling on land, trying to start new towns and cities.

 

Having identified the ultimate destination, then I had to study the historic maps to determine the route they would most likely take to wend their way across hostile land and territory. How would a lady with an infant travel from the eastern coast near Charlestown (present-day Charleston), South Carolina, across rough roads and trails, crossing swollen rivers, mountains, and forests to the edge of the newly independent country?

As difficult as it must have been, she’d most likely travel by wagon as far as possible. Perhaps later she’d be forced to ride astride through the roughest terrain, but for my purposes, she’d start out in a wagon of some fashion. Which she did through the end of the story, which ends long before she would have reached her destination.

I believe in understanding the situations my characters would have faced in their day and with the constraints of the society and the technology available. Adhering as closely as possible, based on research, to the realities of life in the 18th century enriches the context of the stories. People then faced very different challenges on a day-to-day basis than we do today. The speed with which we can travel across America, and indeed the world, would be truly astonishing to people living in the 1700s. That’s one aspect of life in the past that I’ve tried to underscore for my readers. Did I succeed?

Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and opinions!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Evelyn's PromiseIf you’re interested in buying your own copy of Evelyn’s Promise, you can find her story at the following links. Thanks!

B&N: http://bit.ly/1SCcwTJ

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Between the Lines: Joanna and the Lone Star Flag #womenshistorymonth #history

No matter what cause you want to support, it’s common to have a flag or banner to rally behind. The honor of creating the rallying point would have to carry a lot of meaning and pride to the person bestowed with the task. Imagine then how 17-year-old Joanna Troutman felt when in 1835 she presented her gift of a flag to the leader of the Georgia troops heading ultimately to the battle at Goliad, in what is now Texas.

The accounts of how Joanna decided to make the Lone Star flag differ on the details. They agree that she used silk skirts to make the background and the star, and that she embroidered the motto “Liberty or Death” on one side, and the Latin motto “Ubi Libertas Habitat Ibi Patria Est” – where liberty dwells, there is my country – on the other. They also agree that she gave the completed flag to Lieutenant Colonel William Ward to carry to Lieutenant Hugh McLeod, and that McLeod sent her a letter thanking her for the flag.

JoannaTroutmanPortraitTexasCapitol1109JTThe version of how this came about that I think makes the most sense is that she met Hugh McLeod while she was working at the inn, and that McLeod gave her the idea of the star, and asked her to make the flag. She went home and her mother helped her plan materials to make the flag and the motto. Then she made it over the course of the next day or so, and took it to the inn to give it to McLeod.

The Georgia troops carried the Lone Star flag with them as they went on to join with the troops at the Mission of La Bahia at Goliad. While there on March 8, 1836, the troops received word that Texas had been declared free from Mexican rule. The flag was raised during the celebration that followed. At sunset, while lowering the flag, it snarled in the ropes and the banner was torn. The tatters remained flying until Santa Anna had completed his mission of killing the American troops on March 27, 1836. No remnants of Joanna’s flag survive today.

texas-flag-lonestar-state-usaWhile her flag no longer exists, the concept of the Texas Lone Star flag remains intact. And several landmarks and exhibits wait for visitors to view and learn of this remarkable young lady’s contribution to American history. A bronze statue marking Joanna Troutman’s grave is easily visible when you enter the State Cemetery in Austin, Texas. The monument also commemorates the men who died at Goliad. A silver spoon and fork from Santa Anna’s private collection, which had been given to Joanna by Sam Houston after Santa Anna’s defeat, now are on display in the Witte Museum in San Antonio, Texas. Joanna’s portrait hangs at the state Capitol in Austin, Texas. A plaque set in white stone stands on the lawn of the Knoxville, Georgia, court house. In part the plaque says, “On this site in 1835, Joanna Troutman gave to a company of Georgia soldiers … a ‘Lone Star’ Flag, which she had made….”

I have to admit, that as I compiled the research for each of the stories in Hometown Heroines, I became increasingly impressed by the courage and creative inspirations they exhibited through their actions. Who inspires you? Who is your role model?

Literary Classics International Book Awards - Youth Award Winning Book
Literary Classics International Book Awards – Youth Award Winning Book

Interested in your own copy of the book? You can find it in ebook and/or paperback at the following sites:

Amazon: http://amzn.to/VrXZy6

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Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts and opinions! Until next time!

Betty

P.S. If you haven’t already, please consider signing up for my newsletter, which I only send out when there is news to share. News like new covers, new releases, and upcoming appearances where I love to meet my readers. Thanks and happy reading!

Between the Lines: Annie’s Telegram #womenshistorymonth #research

In honor of Women’s History Month, I’m continuing to share a few of the ladies from my book, Hometown Heroines: True Stories of Bravery, Daring, and Adventure. Today I’d like to share the story of Ann Ellsworth.AnnieEllsworth

Who was she, you may ask? A polite young lady whose father, Henry Leavitt Ellsworth, served as the commissioner of the Patent Office. The Ellsworth’s lived in Washington, D.C. in the first half of the 1800s.

When Ann was seventeen years old, her father’s friend, Samuel Finley Breeze Morse, was waiting for final approval by Congress to build the world’s first telegraph line from Washington to Baltimore, Maryland. Samuel had given up on its passage before the Congress adjourned at midnight, and returned to his hotel. Henry managed to get the bill voted on, and passed by a vote of 89 to 83 on March 3, 1843. Henry told Ann the next morning and she was given permission to congratulate Samuel, and became the first person to tell him the good news. For this, Samuel promised to let her choose the first words, which she did with her mother. She chose the Bible verse Numbers 23:23, “What hath God wrought!”

On March 24, 1844, the message was sent via Morse’s telegraph to Baltimore and back in a matter of moments. Because Ann had written the message and delivered it to Morse, she has been honored as the first telegraph messenger girl. Recently, I learned that another famous lady was in the room. Dolley Madison witnessed the history making event, and then Morse invited her to send the first personal telegram. She sent a message to her cousin who lived in Baltimore.

Imagine being part of such a monumental moment as when a message could be sent over such a long distance in a matter of seconds. The ability to communicate more quickly led to other abilities and progress in other technologies, like phones and fax machines. On a personal note, my paternal grandparents both worked as telegraph operators in Georgia in the early 1900s.

Have you ever sent or received a telegram? What did it say?

Literary Classics International Book Awards - Youth Award Winning Book
Literary Classics International Book Awards – Youth Award Winning Book

Interested in your own copy of the book? You can find it in both ebook and paperback at the following sites:

Amazon: http://amzn.to/VrXZy6

BN: http://bit.ly/1wbftz7

Thanks for swinging by to spend a few minutes with me. Until next time!

Betty

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